This is Big Book

  • The Zen Approach to UX (User Experience)
  • Amazon.com: The Zen Approach to Project Management.



If there was one thing you thought would be impervious to the mindfulness revolution - it might be washing up. Crusted ketchup stuck to the plate, tea bags clogging up the strainer, knives threatening to stab you from a pool of slimy water: surely there can’t be anything spiritual about it?

A recent study from Florida State University set out to investigate whether washing dishes could be used as an informal contemplative practice. They concluded that taking a mindful approach to this familiar chore can significantly increase our overall sense of wellbeing.

“One reason we don’t often value the opportunity to wash up is because we are wrapped up in thinking about whatever is coming next: we want to get back to the computer or the television, or make a phone call or a cup of tea. It's easy, in a life that esteems busyness, to let our thoughts be constantly chasing the future.

But always thinking about the next thing is a tragedy. If we do it too often, we lose the capacity to fully experience the present moment. It’s a skill, noticing how we are feeling, and what we are thinking, right now. Washing up can help us hone that skill. To let go of what we are holding in our minds, we need only to pay attention to what we hold in our hands.”

If there was one thing you thought would be impervious to the mindfulness revolution - it might be washing up. Crusted ketchup stuck to the plate, tea bags clogging up the strainer, knives threatening to stab you from a pool of slimy water: surely there can’t be anything spiritual about it?

A recent study from Florida State University set out to investigate whether washing dishes could be used as an informal contemplative practice. They concluded that taking a mindful approach to this familiar chore can significantly increase our overall sense of wellbeing.

“One reason we don’t often value the opportunity to wash up is because we are wrapped up in thinking about whatever is coming next: we want to get back to the computer or the television, or make a phone call or a cup of tea. It's easy, in a life that esteems busyness, to let our thoughts be constantly chasing the future.

But always thinking about the next thing is a tragedy. If we do it too often, we lose the capacity to fully experience the present moment. It’s a skill, noticing how we are feeling, and what we are thinking, right now. Washing up can help us hone that skill. To let go of what we are holding in our minds, we need only to pay attention to what we hold in our hands.”

kaizen ( 改善 ) , is the Japanese word for "improvement". In business, kaizen refers to activities that continuously improve all functions and involve all employees from the CEO to the assembly line workers. It also applies to processes, such as purchasing and logistics , that cross organizational boundaries into the supply chain . [1] It has been applied in healthcare, [2] psychotherapy , [3] life-coaching , government, banking, and other industries.

By improving standardized programmes and processes, kaizen aims to eliminate waste (see lean manufacturing ). Kaizen was first practiced in Japanese businesses after the Second World War , influenced in part by American business and quality-management teachers, and most notably as part of The Toyota Way . It has since spread throughout the world [4] and has been applied to environments outside business and productivity.

While kaizen (at Toyota) usually delivers small improvements, the culture of continual aligned small improvements and standardization yields large results in terms of overall improvement in productivity. This philosophy differs from the " command and control " improvement programs (e g Business Process Improvement) of the mid-twentieth century. Kaizen methodology includes making changes and monitoring results, then adjusting. Large-scale pre-planning and extensive project scheduling are replaced by smaller experiments, which can be rapidly adapted as new improvements are suggested. [ citation needed ]



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