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Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that seriously affects a person's ability to carry out daily activities. Read more on MedlinePlus.gov.

Polyphagia means "eating too much". It derives from the Greek words (polys) which means "very much", and (phago), verb for ... Read on Wikipedia

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that seriously affects a person's ability to carry out daily activities. Read more on MedlinePlus.gov.

Polyphagia means "eating too much". It derives from the Greek words (polys) which means "very much", and (phago), verb for ... Read on Wikipedia

Eating and drinking on public transport is increasingly tightly policed – much to the relief of those who find having to watch, smell and hear other people eat intolerable. Here is our guide to conscientious in-transit eating

At the opposite extreme of this standoff, you have equally selfish people. On one flank, there are those people who want to eat leftover curry on the tube at 7.30am. On the other, there are delicate flowers who never eat in public, and who cannot stomach the thought of someone sucking a boiled sweet three seats away. We will have to leave the psycho-sociological analysis of these two tribes (I’m saying that they are both Thatcher’s children) for another time.

Surely, however, it is not beyond us to fathom a few simple rules that would enable us to share public transport, eaters and non-eaters alike? It is a task of reconciliation, I would argue, which in our increasingly time-poor world is a perfectly reasonable ask. If I am rushing from work on Friday night and want to eat before meeting a mate for a pint, why should I suffer the disapproval of other passengers (much less a fine) because I want to eat a ham sandwich en route? Compared with BO, barging impatience and barrel-gobbed businessmen that we all have to suffer on public transport, surely eating is a minor irritation?

Eggs are laid by female animals of many different species, including birds , reptiles , amphibians , mammals , and fish , and have been eaten by humans for thousands of years. [1] Bird and reptile eggs consist of a protective eggshell , albumen ( egg white ), and vitellus ( egg yolk ), contained within various thin membranes. The most commonly consumed eggs are chicken eggs. Other poultry eggs including those of duck and quail are also eaten. Fish eggs are called roe and caviar .

Egg yolks and whole eggs store significant amounts of protein and choline , [2] [3] and are widely used in cookery. Due to their protein content, the United States Department of Agriculture categorizes eggs as Meats within the Food Guide Pyramid . [2] Despite the nutritional value of eggs, there are some potential health issues arising from cholesterol content, salmonella contamination and allergy to egg proteins.

Chickens and other egg-laying creatures are widely kept throughout the world, and mass production of chicken eggs is a global industry. In 2009, an estimated 62.1 million metric tons of eggs were produced worldwide from a total laying flock of approximately 6.4 billion hens. [4] There are issues of regional variation in demand and expectation, as well as current debates concerning methods of mass production. In 2012, the European Union banned battery husbandry of chickens.

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1 Nutrition and Dietetics, Flinders University of South Australia, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
2 Discipline of Public Health, Flinders University of South Australia, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
3 Health Promotion Branch, SA Health, Government of South Australia, P.O. Box 287 Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia

Copyright © 2013 Annabelle Wilson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Overweight and obesity are a global concern in both developed and developing countries and in school age children, the prevalence continues to remain high. Australian childhood overweight and obesity rates have been shown to be 25.3% for boys and girls aged 5–17 years, comprised of 17.7% overweight and 7.6% obese [ 1 ]. There is a clear need for effective prevention efforts to address the high prevalence of childhood and adult obesity [ 2 ] without which obesity will become the primary cause of preventative deaths worldwide [ 3 ].

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that seriously affects a person's ability to carry out daily activities. Read more on MedlinePlus.gov.

Polyphagia means "eating too much". It derives from the Greek words (polys) which means "very much", and (phago), verb for ... Read on Wikipedia

Eating and drinking on public transport is increasingly tightly policed – much to the relief of those who find having to watch, smell and hear other people eat intolerable. Here is our guide to conscientious in-transit eating

At the opposite extreme of this standoff, you have equally selfish people. On one flank, there are those people who want to eat leftover curry on the tube at 7.30am. On the other, there are delicate flowers who never eat in public, and who cannot stomach the thought of someone sucking a boiled sweet three seats away. We will have to leave the psycho-sociological analysis of these two tribes (I’m saying that they are both Thatcher’s children) for another time.

Surely, however, it is not beyond us to fathom a few simple rules that would enable us to share public transport, eaters and non-eaters alike? It is a task of reconciliation, I would argue, which in our increasingly time-poor world is a perfectly reasonable ask. If I am rushing from work on Friday night and want to eat before meeting a mate for a pint, why should I suffer the disapproval of other passengers (much less a fine) because I want to eat a ham sandwich en route? Compared with BO, barging impatience and barrel-gobbed businessmen that we all have to suffer on public transport, surely eating is a minor irritation?

Eggs are laid by female animals of many different species, including birds , reptiles , amphibians , mammals , and fish , and have been eaten by humans for thousands of years. [1] Bird and reptile eggs consist of a protective eggshell , albumen ( egg white ), and vitellus ( egg yolk ), contained within various thin membranes. The most commonly consumed eggs are chicken eggs. Other poultry eggs including those of duck and quail are also eaten. Fish eggs are called roe and caviar .

Egg yolks and whole eggs store significant amounts of protein and choline , [2] [3] and are widely used in cookery. Due to their protein content, the United States Department of Agriculture categorizes eggs as Meats within the Food Guide Pyramid . [2] Despite the nutritional value of eggs, there are some potential health issues arising from cholesterol content, salmonella contamination and allergy to egg proteins.

Chickens and other egg-laying creatures are widely kept throughout the world, and mass production of chicken eggs is a global industry. In 2009, an estimated 62.1 million metric tons of eggs were produced worldwide from a total laying flock of approximately 6.4 billion hens. [4] There are issues of regional variation in demand and expectation, as well as current debates concerning methods of mass production. In 2012, the European Union banned battery husbandry of chickens.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that seriously affects a person's ability to carry out daily activities. Read more on MedlinePlus.gov.

Polyphagia means "eating too much". It derives from the Greek words (polys) which means "very much", and (phago), verb for ... Read on Wikipedia

Eating and drinking on public transport is increasingly tightly policed – much to the relief of those who find having to watch, smell and hear other people eat intolerable. Here is our guide to conscientious in-transit eating

At the opposite extreme of this standoff, you have equally selfish people. On one flank, there are those people who want to eat leftover curry on the tube at 7.30am. On the other, there are delicate flowers who never eat in public, and who cannot stomach the thought of someone sucking a boiled sweet three seats away. We will have to leave the psycho-sociological analysis of these two tribes (I’m saying that they are both Thatcher’s children) for another time.

Surely, however, it is not beyond us to fathom a few simple rules that would enable us to share public transport, eaters and non-eaters alike? It is a task of reconciliation, I would argue, which in our increasingly time-poor world is a perfectly reasonable ask. If I am rushing from work on Friday night and want to eat before meeting a mate for a pint, why should I suffer the disapproval of other passengers (much less a fine) because I want to eat a ham sandwich en route? Compared with BO, barging impatience and barrel-gobbed businessmen that we all have to suffer on public transport, surely eating is a minor irritation?

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that seriously affects a person's ability to carry out daily activities. Read more on MedlinePlus.gov.

Polyphagia means "eating too much". It derives from the Greek words (polys) which means "very much", and (phago), verb for ... Read on Wikipedia

Eating and drinking on public transport is increasingly tightly policed – much to the relief of those who find having to watch, smell and hear other people eat intolerable. Here is our guide to conscientious in-transit eating

At the opposite extreme of this standoff, you have equally selfish people. On one flank, there are those people who want to eat leftover curry on the tube at 7.30am. On the other, there are delicate flowers who never eat in public, and who cannot stomach the thought of someone sucking a boiled sweet three seats away. We will have to leave the psycho-sociological analysis of these two tribes (I’m saying that they are both Thatcher’s children) for another time.

Surely, however, it is not beyond us to fathom a few simple rules that would enable us to share public transport, eaters and non-eaters alike? It is a task of reconciliation, I would argue, which in our increasingly time-poor world is a perfectly reasonable ask. If I am rushing from work on Friday night and want to eat before meeting a mate for a pint, why should I suffer the disapproval of other passengers (much less a fine) because I want to eat a ham sandwich en route? Compared with BO, barging impatience and barrel-gobbed businessmen that we all have to suffer on public transport, surely eating is a minor irritation?

Eggs are laid by female animals of many different species, including birds , reptiles , amphibians , mammals , and fish , and have been eaten by humans for thousands of years. [1] Bird and reptile eggs consist of a protective eggshell , albumen ( egg white ), and vitellus ( egg yolk ), contained within various thin membranes. The most commonly consumed eggs are chicken eggs. Other poultry eggs including those of duck and quail are also eaten. Fish eggs are called roe and caviar .

Egg yolks and whole eggs store significant amounts of protein and choline , [2] [3] and are widely used in cookery. Due to their protein content, the United States Department of Agriculture categorizes eggs as Meats within the Food Guide Pyramid . [2] Despite the nutritional value of eggs, there are some potential health issues arising from cholesterol content, salmonella contamination and allergy to egg proteins.

Chickens and other egg-laying creatures are widely kept throughout the world, and mass production of chicken eggs is a global industry. In 2009, an estimated 62.1 million metric tons of eggs were produced worldwide from a total laying flock of approximately 6.4 billion hens. [4] There are issues of regional variation in demand and expectation, as well as current debates concerning methods of mass production. In 2012, the European Union banned battery husbandry of chickens.

By using our service, you agree to our Terms (effective 2/07/2017) and Privacy (effective 2/07/2017).
REFINERY29 name & logo and R29 logo are trademarks of Refinery 29 Inc.



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