This is Big Book

  • let me tell you (composition) - Wikipedia
  • Let Me Tell You: New Stories, Essays, and Other Writings.



Bear with me, it’s the best name I came up with. This is the last one in the group of “narrative songs”.

There are different variants of it, but most of the tome basics, someone explains something directly to the audience, or he explains something to another character (though the message is naturally still for the audience). Alan A Dale (Robin Hood) is a perfect example for the first variant. Merlin’s songs (Sword in the Stone) tend to fall into the latter category. In some rare cases “Let me tell you something” songs are even sung from the off, though they are hard to recognize as such, because songs which are song from the off tend to fall in multiple categories.

The best example for a clear cut “Let me tell you something” song from the off is “No way out” from Brother Bear, though in this case what is sung from the off is not the same as what is said in the scene to Koda, it is more the attempt (emphasis on attempt) to add an additional layer to the story the audience already knows by explaining the feelings behind it. Generally speaking those songs have to balance a very fine line between adding to the story and being too much on the nose. Some of them come off as downright preachy (“Colours of the Wind” from Pocahontas springs into mind)

So I’ve been seeing the number 22, or at least some variation of it (222, 322, 422, etc.), almost EVERYWHERE for about a year now. Somewhere along the way I decided to find out what the biblical meaning for the number 22 is.

My friend, Mrs. Karen (she’s the real MVP), did a little digging and found out that to write twenty-two in Hebrew, they wrote two Hebrew letters: kaph-beth . These signify the open palm in the act of giving something to the house or household.

Well that’s a cool thought. After learning that, every time I would see the number 22, I would say out loud, “thank you Lord for your open palm of blessing towards my house.”

Bear with me, it’s the best name I came up with. This is the last one in the group of “narrative songs”.

There are different variants of it, but most of the tome basics, someone explains something directly to the audience, or he explains something to another character (though the message is naturally still for the audience). Alan A Dale (Robin Hood) is a perfect example for the first variant. Merlin’s songs (Sword in the Stone) tend to fall into the latter category. In some rare cases “Let me tell you something” songs are even sung from the off, though they are hard to recognize as such, because songs which are song from the off tend to fall in multiple categories.

The best example for a clear cut “Let me tell you something” song from the off is “No way out” from Brother Bear, though in this case what is sung from the off is not the same as what is said in the scene to Koda, it is more the attempt (emphasis on attempt) to add an additional layer to the story the audience already knows by explaining the feelings behind it. Generally speaking those songs have to balance a very fine line between adding to the story and being too much on the nose. Some of them come off as downright preachy (“Colours of the Wind” from Pocahontas springs into mind)

So I’ve been seeing the number 22, or at least some variation of it (222, 322, 422, etc.), almost EVERYWHERE for about a year now. Somewhere along the way I decided to find out what the biblical meaning for the number 22 is.

My friend, Mrs. Karen (she’s the real MVP), did a little digging and found out that to write twenty-two in Hebrew, they wrote two Hebrew letters: kaph-beth . These signify the open palm in the act of giving something to the house or household.

Well that’s a cool thought. After learning that, every time I would see the number 22, I would say out loud, “thank you Lord for your open palm of blessing towards my house.”

If this song really means something special to you, describe your feelings and thoughts . Don't hesitate to explain what songwriters and singer wanted to say. Also we collected some tips and tricks for you:

“It takes a special person to be a hospice nurse.”  I hear that a lot when I meet people.  Then they tend to turn away, perhaps afraid to linger too long near “the angel of death.”  I often wish I could follow them and say, “Wait, let me tell you what it’s really like.  Let me tell you what a privilege it is to walk with a family through such an intensely private and emotional time.  Let me tell you that contrary to popular opinion, we don’t help people die.  We help them live each day to the fullest with as little pain as possible; with as little anxiety as possible.”

I love my job.  I love that palliative care—which focuses on pain and symptom management and care of the whole person— is finally recognized as cutting edge, specialized medicine.  I love the autonomy my job provides.  I love the fact that I need to know more as a hospice nurse than I ever did as a hospital nurse.  I love being able to call a physician to make recommendations and, because I have worked hard to build a relationship and a reputation for sound judgment, have him or her say, “Whatever you think is fine with me.” 

Sure, saying goodbye is always sad.  But when you hear from a family that their grief is eased because their loved one had a peaceful death?  Well, there’s no feeling to compare to that.  Am I special?   I don’t think so.  That designation is reserved for those who face each day they have left, no matter how few, with dignity and courage.  Still able to embrace life.  Still willing to love and be loved.  Let me tell you–that’s special!

Fresh off his trip to Reno, Nevada where he was instrumental in accomplishing the previously unheard of task of persuading The American Legion to pass Resolution 40 calling on Congress to conduct an investigation of the attack on our ship, USS Liberty Survivor, Bryce Lockwood had a one-on-one meeting with President Donald Trump.

Not one to rest on his laurels and recognizing that while this opportunity has never presented itself before, Bryce quickly briefed the President about the attack and the fact that it has never been investigated by the US government after which he slipped a USS Liberty Challenge Coin into Mr. Trump’s hand.

Bryce then spent time briefing the personnel accompanying Mr. Trump about the USS Liberty and of our effort to ensure the US government finally conducts an investigation of the attack.  Everyone he spoke with was very interested in what Bryce had to say.  Probably because many were either active duty military, veterans or – like USS Liberty Survivor Lloyd Painter – members or veterans of the Secret Service.

Bear with me, it’s the best name I came up with. This is the last one in the group of “narrative songs”.

There are different variants of it, but most of the tome basics, someone explains something directly to the audience, or he explains something to another character (though the message is naturally still for the audience). Alan A Dale (Robin Hood) is a perfect example for the first variant. Merlin’s songs (Sword in the Stone) tend to fall into the latter category. In some rare cases “Let me tell you something” songs are even sung from the off, though they are hard to recognize as such, because songs which are song from the off tend to fall in multiple categories.

The best example for a clear cut “Let me tell you something” song from the off is “No way out” from Brother Bear, though in this case what is sung from the off is not the same as what is said in the scene to Koda, it is more the attempt (emphasis on attempt) to add an additional layer to the story the audience already knows by explaining the feelings behind it. Generally speaking those songs have to balance a very fine line between adding to the story and being too much on the nose. Some of them come off as downright preachy (“Colours of the Wind” from Pocahontas springs into mind)

Bear with me, it’s the best name I came up with. This is the last one in the group of “narrative songs”.

There are different variants of it, but most of the tome basics, someone explains something directly to the audience, or he explains something to another character (though the message is naturally still for the audience). Alan A Dale (Robin Hood) is a perfect example for the first variant. Merlin’s songs (Sword in the Stone) tend to fall into the latter category. In some rare cases “Let me tell you something” songs are even sung from the off, though they are hard to recognize as such, because songs which are song from the off tend to fall in multiple categories.

The best example for a clear cut “Let me tell you something” song from the off is “No way out” from Brother Bear, though in this case what is sung from the off is not the same as what is said in the scene to Koda, it is more the attempt (emphasis on attempt) to add an additional layer to the story the audience already knows by explaining the feelings behind it. Generally speaking those songs have to balance a very fine line between adding to the story and being too much on the nose. Some of them come off as downright preachy (“Colours of the Wind” from Pocahontas springs into mind)

So I’ve been seeing the number 22, or at least some variation of it (222, 322, 422, etc.), almost EVERYWHERE for about a year now. Somewhere along the way I decided to find out what the biblical meaning for the number 22 is.

My friend, Mrs. Karen (she’s the real MVP), did a little digging and found out that to write twenty-two in Hebrew, they wrote two Hebrew letters: kaph-beth . These signify the open palm in the act of giving something to the house or household.

Well that’s a cool thought. After learning that, every time I would see the number 22, I would say out loud, “thank you Lord for your open palm of blessing towards my house.”

If this song really means something special to you, describe your feelings and thoughts . Don't hesitate to explain what songwriters and singer wanted to say. Also we collected some tips and tricks for you:

Bear with me, it’s the best name I came up with. This is the last one in the group of “narrative songs”.

There are different variants of it, but most of the tome basics, someone explains something directly to the audience, or he explains something to another character (though the message is naturally still for the audience). Alan A Dale (Robin Hood) is a perfect example for the first variant. Merlin’s songs (Sword in the Stone) tend to fall into the latter category. In some rare cases “Let me tell you something” songs are even sung from the off, though they are hard to recognize as such, because songs which are song from the off tend to fall in multiple categories.

The best example for a clear cut “Let me tell you something” song from the off is “No way out” from Brother Bear, though in this case what is sung from the off is not the same as what is said in the scene to Koda, it is more the attempt (emphasis on attempt) to add an additional layer to the story the audience already knows by explaining the feelings behind it. Generally speaking those songs have to balance a very fine line between adding to the story and being too much on the nose. Some of them come off as downright preachy (“Colours of the Wind” from Pocahontas springs into mind)

So I’ve been seeing the number 22, or at least some variation of it (222, 322, 422, etc.), almost EVERYWHERE for about a year now. Somewhere along the way I decided to find out what the biblical meaning for the number 22 is.

My friend, Mrs. Karen (she’s the real MVP), did a little digging and found out that to write twenty-two in Hebrew, they wrote two Hebrew letters: kaph-beth . These signify the open palm in the act of giving something to the house or household.

Well that’s a cool thought. After learning that, every time I would see the number 22, I would say out loud, “thank you Lord for your open palm of blessing towards my house.”

If this song really means something special to you, describe your feelings and thoughts . Don't hesitate to explain what songwriters and singer wanted to say. Also we collected some tips and tricks for you:

“It takes a special person to be a hospice nurse.”  I hear that a lot when I meet people.  Then they tend to turn away, perhaps afraid to linger too long near “the angel of death.”  I often wish I could follow them and say, “Wait, let me tell you what it’s really like.  Let me tell you what a privilege it is to walk with a family through such an intensely private and emotional time.  Let me tell you that contrary to popular opinion, we don’t help people die.  We help them live each day to the fullest with as little pain as possible; with as little anxiety as possible.”

I love my job.  I love that palliative care—which focuses on pain and symptom management and care of the whole person— is finally recognized as cutting edge, specialized medicine.  I love the autonomy my job provides.  I love the fact that I need to know more as a hospice nurse than I ever did as a hospital nurse.  I love being able to call a physician to make recommendations and, because I have worked hard to build a relationship and a reputation for sound judgment, have him or her say, “Whatever you think is fine with me.” 

Sure, saying goodbye is always sad.  But when you hear from a family that their grief is eased because their loved one had a peaceful death?  Well, there’s no feeling to compare to that.  Am I special?   I don’t think so.  That designation is reserved for those who face each day they have left, no matter how few, with dignity and courage.  Still able to embrace life.  Still willing to love and be loved.  Let me tell you–that’s special!



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