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  • Christmas at Biltmore | Special Events - Explore Asheville
  • Christmas - Biltmore Estate



Transforming Biltmore into a Christmas wonderland takes thousands of lights, miles of ribbon and greenery, and gallons of hot glue. But it all begins with one simple question: What would George Vanderbilt do?

On shelves stacked to the workshop’s high ceiling, boxes affixed with a sample sprig of their contents are hand-lettered: “golden pear stems and leaves”, “holly variegated”, “red pepper berry.” One designer, her supplies unpacked and ready, covers poultry netting with quilt batting to create hills and dales of snow. Another designer finishes a dollhouse by adding stepping stones cut from cereal box cardboard. Someone else rolls out lengths of Volara, an archival-quality protective foam impervious to water. Electrical cords dangle overhead, keeping pans of adhesive liquefied. “When you smell hot glue, Christmas is coming!” Cathy Barnhardt, Biltmore’s floral displays manager, says cheerfully.

It’s July 7. And not a day too soon to prepare for Biltmore’s high holiday: There are five floors of rooms to transform and 32 fireplace mantels to make festive. But there are rules to follow, too: Not a single nail can go into any door frame, molding, or other historic woodwork. And decorations must be as elegant and creative as what the Vanderbilts themselves would have used — had glue guns been handy in 1895.

RALEIGH — A 35-foot North Carolina Fraser fir tree arrived at Biltmore this week as staff finished decorating America’s largest home for Christmas. The tree came from Andrews Nursery in Avery County and is decorated with 500 ornaments and wrapped packages tucked into its branches. It serves as the seasonal centerpiece in the home’s Banquet Hall. Christmas at Biltmore runs through Jan. 7, 2018.

The forest welcomes visitors to its more than 10,000 acres of famous trails and waterfalls year-round and all it asks is that you leave it just as you found it — pristine. The fight to […]

WILMINGTON — On a Thursday afternoon, Hannah Shreckengost, 21, arrives at Whole Foods market. While not a usual grocery trip for herself, Shreckengost is one of many personal, independent contract shoppers for Shipt. Her list […]

Transforming Biltmore into a Christmas wonderland takes thousands of lights, miles of ribbon and greenery, and gallons of hot glue. But it all begins with one simple question: What would George Vanderbilt do?

On shelves stacked to the workshop’s high ceiling, boxes affixed with a sample sprig of their contents are hand-lettered: “golden pear stems and leaves”, “holly variegated”, “red pepper berry.” One designer, her supplies unpacked and ready, covers poultry netting with quilt batting to create hills and dales of snow. Another designer finishes a dollhouse by adding stepping stones cut from cereal box cardboard. Someone else rolls out lengths of Volara, an archival-quality protective foam impervious to water. Electrical cords dangle overhead, keeping pans of adhesive liquefied. “When you smell hot glue, Christmas is coming!” Cathy Barnhardt, Biltmore’s floral displays manager, says cheerfully.

It’s July 7. And not a day too soon to prepare for Biltmore’s high holiday: There are five floors of rooms to transform and 32 fireplace mantels to make festive. But there are rules to follow, too: Not a single nail can go into any door frame, molding, or other historic woodwork. And decorations must be as elegant and creative as what the Vanderbilts themselves would have used — had glue guns been handy in 1895.

RALEIGH — A 35-foot North Carolina Fraser fir tree arrived at Biltmore this week as staff finished decorating America’s largest home for Christmas. The tree came from Andrews Nursery in Avery County and is decorated with 500 ornaments and wrapped packages tucked into its branches. It serves as the seasonal centerpiece in the home’s Banquet Hall. Christmas at Biltmore runs through Jan. 7, 2018.

The forest welcomes visitors to its more than 10,000 acres of famous trails and waterfalls year-round and all it asks is that you leave it just as you found it — pristine. The fight to […]

WILMINGTON — On a Thursday afternoon, Hannah Shreckengost, 21, arrives at Whole Foods market. While not a usual grocery trip for herself, Shreckengost is one of many personal, independent contract shoppers for Shipt. Her list […]

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Diane T. Ashley, a “town girl” born and raised in Mississippi, has worked more than twenty years for the House of Representatives. She rediscovered a thirst for writing, was led to a class taught by Aaron McCarver, and became a founding member of the Bards of Faith.

Transforming Biltmore into a Christmas wonderland takes thousands of lights, miles of ribbon and greenery, and gallons of hot glue. But it all begins with one simple question: What would George Vanderbilt do?

On shelves stacked to the workshop’s high ceiling, boxes affixed with a sample sprig of their contents are hand-lettered: “golden pear stems and leaves”, “holly variegated”, “red pepper berry.” One designer, her supplies unpacked and ready, covers poultry netting with quilt batting to create hills and dales of snow. Another designer finishes a dollhouse by adding stepping stones cut from cereal box cardboard. Someone else rolls out lengths of Volara, an archival-quality protective foam impervious to water. Electrical cords dangle overhead, keeping pans of adhesive liquefied. “When you smell hot glue, Christmas is coming!” Cathy Barnhardt, Biltmore’s floral displays manager, says cheerfully.

It’s July 7. And not a day too soon to prepare for Biltmore’s high holiday: There are five floors of rooms to transform and 32 fireplace mantels to make festive. But there are rules to follow, too: Not a single nail can go into any door frame, molding, or other historic woodwork. And decorations must be as elegant and creative as what the Vanderbilts themselves would have used — had glue guns been handy in 1895.

Transforming Biltmore into a Christmas wonderland takes thousands of lights, miles of ribbon and greenery, and gallons of hot glue. But it all begins with one simple question: What would George Vanderbilt do?

On shelves stacked to the workshop’s high ceiling, boxes affixed with a sample sprig of their contents are hand-lettered: “golden pear stems and leaves”, “holly variegated”, “red pepper berry.” One designer, her supplies unpacked and ready, covers poultry netting with quilt batting to create hills and dales of snow. Another designer finishes a dollhouse by adding stepping stones cut from cereal box cardboard. Someone else rolls out lengths of Volara, an archival-quality protective foam impervious to water. Electrical cords dangle overhead, keeping pans of adhesive liquefied. “When you smell hot glue, Christmas is coming!” Cathy Barnhardt, Biltmore’s floral displays manager, says cheerfully.

It’s July 7. And not a day too soon to prepare for Biltmore’s high holiday: There are five floors of rooms to transform and 32 fireplace mantels to make festive. But there are rules to follow, too: Not a single nail can go into any door frame, molding, or other historic woodwork. And decorations must be as elegant and creative as what the Vanderbilts themselves would have used — had glue guns been handy in 1895.

RALEIGH — A 35-foot North Carolina Fraser fir tree arrived at Biltmore this week as staff finished decorating America’s largest home for Christmas. The tree came from Andrews Nursery in Avery County and is decorated with 500 ornaments and wrapped packages tucked into its branches. It serves as the seasonal centerpiece in the home’s Banquet Hall. Christmas at Biltmore runs through Jan. 7, 2018.

The forest welcomes visitors to its more than 10,000 acres of famous trails and waterfalls year-round and all it asks is that you leave it just as you found it — pristine. The fight to […]

WILMINGTON — On a Thursday afternoon, Hannah Shreckengost, 21, arrives at Whole Foods market. While not a usual grocery trip for herself, Shreckengost is one of many personal, independent contract shoppers for Shipt. Her list […]

Для использования нашего нового интерфейса поиска требуется JavaScript. Включите JavaScript в браузере и повторите попытку .



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