This is Big Book

  • Living Off the Grid in a Solar RV - Solar America
  • What’s Stopping You From Going Off Grid NOW?



Phillip Vannini is a professor in the School of Communication & Culture and the Canada Research Chair in Innovative Learning and Public Ethnography at Royal Roads University in Victoria.

Jonathan Taggart is a Boreal Collective photographer and PhD student in Resources, Environment and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia.

To make our travels and encounters with off-gridders possible, Jonathan and I had to fly on dozens of planes, ride snowmobiles, paddle kayaks and canoes, walk in snowshoes, ride ATVs, sail on ferries and small boats, bike and trek across many beautiful regions of our country. Our encounters with off-gridders young and old, far and near and rich and poor inspired us to reflect not only about off-grid life in itself, but also to question our collective, modern, on -grid way of life. The lessons we learned are about disconnection as much as they are about everything we all take for granted about the modern condition and its comforts, conveniences and connectivity.

“Boondocking” basically refers to camping long-term completely off the grid without external power, gas, waste, and water hookups.

Thousands of people everywhere are boondocking right now. Many are far out of your sight, enjoying the wilderness, like a pioneer. Others are doing it right under your nose, living quiet lives in and out of their tiny-home vehicles, driving off whenever they see fit.

While urban boondocking seems to be a decaying art form as cities crack down on “overnighting” (even making a dent on Walmart’s long-time encouragement of 24-hr RV parking), the American West still has thousands of square miles of scarcely explored public wilderness that can be camped absolutely freely, as your public right.

Phillip Vannini is a professor in the School of Communication & Culture and the Canada Research Chair in Innovative Learning and Public Ethnography at Royal Roads University in Victoria.

Jonathan Taggart is a Boreal Collective photographer and PhD student in Resources, Environment and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia.

To make our travels and encounters with off-gridders possible, Jonathan and I had to fly on dozens of planes, ride snowmobiles, paddle kayaks and canoes, walk in snowshoes, ride ATVs, sail on ferries and small boats, bike and trek across many beautiful regions of our country. Our encounters with off-gridders young and old, far and near and rich and poor inspired us to reflect not only about off-grid life in itself, but also to question our collective, modern, on -grid way of life. The lessons we learned are about disconnection as much as they are about everything we all take for granted about the modern condition and its comforts, conveniences and connectivity.



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