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  • The 25 Best Movies About World War II « Taste of Cinema.
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This week in 1916 a blockbuster film had its first general release in London’s cinemas. The film went on to be the most popular film in British cinemas until 1977.  It showed genuine footage of men in battle on the Western Front in the Battle of the Somme.

The film was made by Geoffrey Malins and John McDowell, who mixed short sections of mocked up battle scenes with plenty of genuine footage of guns firing, troops moving around in the trenches, men attacking over no-man’s land, the wounded and the explosion of the mine under Hawthorn Ridge (on top of which was a german redoubt).

After a few private showings, the Battle of the Somme film opened in 34 cinemas across London on 21 August 1916. The next day, the Times reported that:

War is an artistically rich topic and many noted cinematic artists have produced works concerning war and a war backdrop. World War II is perhaps and most familiar and fertile of war period settings in the filmmaking universe.

The war which inaugurated the atomic era and in which an accumulated 60 million persons died is considered to be the largest scale conflict of all time, and one which in many ways altered the course of world history forever within a span of six years. Many thought it would be a lesson for humanity, but, in the end, WWII was a conflict where some won the war, but nobody won peace.

The photographer Robert Capa, in the middle of war, facing the enemy on a trench, started to talk about Leo Tolstoy’s literature and how he’d like to read “War and Peace” at that precise moment. Cinema is also bonded with World War II. The conflict has cogently commented on the various aspects of the participating countries during the various phases of the experiences.

This week in 1916 a blockbuster film had its first general release in London’s cinemas. The film went on to be the most popular film in British cinemas until 1977.  It showed genuine footage of men in battle on the Western Front in the Battle of the Somme.

The film was made by Geoffrey Malins and John McDowell, who mixed short sections of mocked up battle scenes with plenty of genuine footage of guns firing, troops moving around in the trenches, men attacking over no-man’s land, the wounded and the explosion of the mine under Hawthorn Ridge (on top of which was a german redoubt).

After a few private showings, the Battle of the Somme film opened in 34 cinemas across London on 21 August 1916. The next day, the Times reported that:



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