This is Big Book

  • Don Quixote - Wikipedia
  • Cervantes and the Comic Mind of his Age - Oxford Scholarship



In his bestseller The Man Who Invented Fiction: How Cervantes Ushered in the Modern World, Professor William Egginton explores Cervantes's life and the world he lived in, examining the ways his writing fundamentally changed literature, and how it provided a unique way of viewing the world. Egginton, translators Edith Grossman and Natasha Wimmer , and author Álvaro Enrigue ( Sudden Death)  explored Cervantes’s impact on not only fiction, but society as we know it.

Edith Grossman is one of the most important translators of Latin American fiction in the past century, and into the 21st, translating the works of Nobel laureate Mario Vargas Llosa, Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez, Mayra Montero, Augusto Monterroso, Jaime Manrique, Julián Ríos, Álvaro Mutis, and of Miguel de Cervantes. In 2006 she received the PEN/Ralph Manheim Medal for Translation, and in 2010 she was awarded the Queen Sofia Spanish Institute Translation Prize.

Álvaro Enrigue is the award winning author of four novels and two books of short stories. Born in Guadelajara, Mexico, he lives in New York and is a Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures at Columbia University. His published works in translation include Hypothermia (2013) and Sudden Death (2016). Enrigue is recipient of the 1996 Joaquín Mortiz Prize, a 2009 Rockefeller Foundation Residence Fellowship, a 2011 Cullman Center Fellowship, and the 2013 Herralde Novel Prize.

In his bestseller The Man Who Invented Fiction: How Cervantes Ushered in the Modern World, Professor William Egginton explores Cervantes's life and the world he lived in, examining the ways his writing fundamentally changed literature, and how it provided a unique way of viewing the world. Egginton, translators Edith Grossman and Natasha Wimmer , and author Álvaro Enrigue ( Sudden Death)  explored Cervantes’s impact on not only fiction, but society as we know it.

Edith Grossman is one of the most important translators of Latin American fiction in the past century, and into the 21st, translating the works of Nobel laureate Mario Vargas Llosa, Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez, Mayra Montero, Augusto Monterroso, Jaime Manrique, Julián Ríos, Álvaro Mutis, and of Miguel de Cervantes. In 2006 she received the PEN/Ralph Manheim Medal for Translation, and in 2010 she was awarded the Queen Sofia Spanish Institute Translation Prize.

Álvaro Enrigue is the award winning author of four novels and two books of short stories. Born in Guadelajara, Mexico, he lives in New York and is a Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures at Columbia University. His published works in translation include Hypothermia (2013) and Sudden Death (2016). Enrigue is recipient of the 1996 Joaquín Mortiz Prize, a 2009 Rockefeller Foundation Residence Fellowship, a 2011 Cullman Center Fellowship, and the 2013 Herralde Novel Prize.

In the opening line of the eponymous masterpiece by Miguel de Cervantes, we meet the character of Don Quixote. He lives, as Cervantes puts it, “in a village of La Mancha, the name of which I have no desire to call to mind”.

It’s a lovely literary trick that sets up the style of the whole novel. Somewhat whimsical and mythical but with enough grounding in truth and enough relatable facts that you can imagine the detail.

For me – and you, as you follow along with me as narrator today – we don’t have the luxury of having no desire to call to mind the names of the villages in La Mancha. They will form the chapters of this journey through the land of Don Quixote, to see the landscapes that our delusional knight rode through, the landmarks where he stopped, and the genesis of the idea in the mind of Cervantes.

In his bestseller The Man Who Invented Fiction: How Cervantes Ushered in the Modern World, Professor William Egginton explores Cervantes's life and the world he lived in, examining the ways his writing fundamentally changed literature, and how it provided a unique way of viewing the world. Egginton, translators Edith Grossman and Natasha Wimmer , and author Álvaro Enrigue ( Sudden Death)  explored Cervantes’s impact on not only fiction, but society as we know it.

Edith Grossman is one of the most important translators of Latin American fiction in the past century, and into the 21st, translating the works of Nobel laureate Mario Vargas Llosa, Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez, Mayra Montero, Augusto Monterroso, Jaime Manrique, Julián Ríos, Álvaro Mutis, and of Miguel de Cervantes. In 2006 she received the PEN/Ralph Manheim Medal for Translation, and in 2010 she was awarded the Queen Sofia Spanish Institute Translation Prize.

Álvaro Enrigue is the award winning author of four novels and two books of short stories. Born in Guadelajara, Mexico, he lives in New York and is a Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures at Columbia University. His published works in translation include Hypothermia (2013) and Sudden Death (2016). Enrigue is recipient of the 1996 Joaquín Mortiz Prize, a 2009 Rockefeller Foundation Residence Fellowship, a 2011 Cullman Center Fellowship, and the 2013 Herralde Novel Prize.

In the opening line of the eponymous masterpiece by Miguel de Cervantes, we meet the character of Don Quixote. He lives, as Cervantes puts it, “in a village of La Mancha, the name of which I have no desire to call to mind”.

It’s a lovely literary trick that sets up the style of the whole novel. Somewhat whimsical and mythical but with enough grounding in truth and enough relatable facts that you can imagine the detail.

For me – and you, as you follow along with me as narrator today – we don’t have the luxury of having no desire to call to mind the names of the villages in La Mancha. They will form the chapters of this journey through the land of Don Quixote, to see the landscapes that our delusional knight rode through, the landmarks where he stopped, and the genesis of the idea in the mind of Cervantes.

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

In his bestseller The Man Who Invented Fiction: How Cervantes Ushered in the Modern World, Professor William Egginton explores Cervantes's life and the world he lived in, examining the ways his writing fundamentally changed literature, and how it provided a unique way of viewing the world. Egginton, translators Edith Grossman and Natasha Wimmer , and author Álvaro Enrigue ( Sudden Death)  explored Cervantes’s impact on not only fiction, but society as we know it.

Edith Grossman is one of the most important translators of Latin American fiction in the past century, and into the 21st, translating the works of Nobel laureate Mario Vargas Llosa, Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez, Mayra Montero, Augusto Monterroso, Jaime Manrique, Julián Ríos, Álvaro Mutis, and of Miguel de Cervantes. In 2006 she received the PEN/Ralph Manheim Medal for Translation, and in 2010 she was awarded the Queen Sofia Spanish Institute Translation Prize.

Álvaro Enrigue is the award winning author of four novels and two books of short stories. Born in Guadelajara, Mexico, he lives in New York and is a Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures at Columbia University. His published works in translation include Hypothermia (2013) and Sudden Death (2016). Enrigue is recipient of the 1996 Joaquín Mortiz Prize, a 2009 Rockefeller Foundation Residence Fellowship, a 2011 Cullman Center Fellowship, and the 2013 Herralde Novel Prize.

In the opening line of the eponymous masterpiece by Miguel de Cervantes, we meet the character of Don Quixote. He lives, as Cervantes puts it, “in a village of La Mancha, the name of which I have no desire to call to mind”.

It’s a lovely literary trick that sets up the style of the whole novel. Somewhat whimsical and mythical but with enough grounding in truth and enough relatable facts that you can imagine the detail.

For me – and you, as you follow along with me as narrator today – we don’t have the luxury of having no desire to call to mind the names of the villages in La Mancha. They will form the chapters of this journey through the land of Don Quixote, to see the landscapes that our delusional knight rode through, the landmarks where he stopped, and the genesis of the idea in the mind of Cervantes.

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

In 1556 Charles V abdicated the thrown, and Philip II was crowned king.  The reign of Philip II was known for its oppression, the power and influence of the Tribunal, and the increased territorial expansion of the Spanish empire. 

Despite these economic problems, many court advisors continued to support aggressive foreign policy and military campaigns, even though Spain was no longer able to afford such initiatives.

Works Consulted:
Canavaggio, Jean.  Cervantes . Translated from French by J. R. Jones. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1990.
Cameron, Rondo.  A Concise Economic History of the World: From Paleolithic Times to the Present . Oxford: Oxford U P, 1997.



my-book-review.info All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher
51B2YP58VBL