This is Big Book

  • Cleveland in World War II by Brian Albrecht & James Banks.
  • Cleveland in World War II tells stories of residents on.



He's the only living Marine to be awarded the Medal of Honor for service in World War II. It was for 'valiant devotion to duty' and 'service above self' during the battle at Iwo Jima.

Woody is in Cleveland on a quest to build a Gold Star Family monument downtown. He even met with Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson to get the ball rolling.

Williams' efforts have already helped to construct 21 monuments, including one in Medina. There are 47 monuments in-progress across the country.

Cleveland in World War II is a collaborative work based on archival sources and contemporary interviews by journalist Brian Albrecht of the Cleveland Plain Dealer  and historian James Banks. The interviews by Albrecht are supported by interviews (2007) from the Western Reserve Historical Society’s collection on WWII.

The objective of the book is to document Clevelanders who were touched by the war, with both home front and war front stories forming a compelling narrative. This was achieved by incorporating an extensive index of residents within the Cleveland metropolitan area. Many of those interviewed have died but their role and recollections are preserved, becoming revered memories of family, friends, and an inspiration for today’s residents.

Given the history of the Crile Archives’ community engagement, it is not surprising that the publication of Cleveland in World War II would generate both interest and sales. The featured stories of journalist Albrecht when combined with the initiatives of the Crile Archives have established a reputation and an anticipated community following on veterans’ history for nearly a quarter century.  The book is truly a city’s memoir of WWII. Nearly 350 proper names are cited, linking memories, accounts, documents, and photos to create a compelling story of how one Midwestern city experienced the war, its hardships, and its victory.

He's the only living Marine to be awarded the Medal of Honor for service in World War II. It was for 'valiant devotion to duty' and 'service above self' during the battle at Iwo Jima.

Woody is in Cleveland on a quest to build a Gold Star Family monument downtown. He even met with Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson to get the ball rolling.

Williams' efforts have already helped to construct 21 monuments, including one in Medina. There are 47 monuments in-progress across the country.

He's the only living Marine to be awarded the Medal of Honor for service in World War II. It was for 'valiant devotion to duty' and 'service above self' during the battle at Iwo Jima.

Woody is in Cleveland on a quest to build a Gold Star Family monument downtown. He even met with Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson to get the ball rolling.

Williams' efforts have already helped to construct 21 monuments, including one in Medina. There are 47 monuments in-progress across the country.

Cleveland in World War II is a collaborative work based on archival sources and contemporary interviews by journalist Brian Albrecht of the Cleveland Plain Dealer  and historian James Banks. The interviews by Albrecht are supported by interviews (2007) from the Western Reserve Historical Society’s collection on WWII.

The objective of the book is to document Clevelanders who were touched by the war, with both home front and war front stories forming a compelling narrative. This was achieved by incorporating an extensive index of residents within the Cleveland metropolitan area. Many of those interviewed have died but their role and recollections are preserved, becoming revered memories of family, friends, and an inspiration for today’s residents.

Given the history of the Crile Archives’ community engagement, it is not surprising that the publication of Cleveland in World War II would generate both interest and sales. The featured stories of journalist Albrecht when combined with the initiatives of the Crile Archives have established a reputation and an anticipated community following on veterans’ history for nearly a quarter century.  The book is truly a city’s memoir of WWII. Nearly 350 proper names are cited, linking memories, accounts, documents, and photos to create a compelling story of how one Midwestern city experienced the war, its hardships, and its victory.

The Great Depression and World War II were two tumultuous events in American history. While both events caused American confidence to wane, the United States emerged from both the Great Depression and World War II stronger and more confident than before.


During the Great Depression, millions of American workers lost their jobs. In Ohio, by 1933, more than forty percent of factory workers and sixty-seven percent of construction workers were unemployed. In 1932, Ohio's unemployment rate for all residents reached 37.3 percent. Industrial workers who retained their jobs usually faced reduced hours and wages. These people had a difficult time supporting their families. Many of Ohio's city residents moved to the countryside, where they hoped to grow enough food to feed their families.


World War II formally ended the Great Depression in the United States, as millions of unemployed men and women returned to work to produce items for the war effort. Ohioans played a critical role in helping the United States attain victory in World War II. Approximately 839,000 Ohioans, roughly twelve percent of the state's entire population in 1940, served in the armed forces during the conflict. Ohio civilians also actively participated in the war effort, joining in scrap drives and growing victory gardens. Thanks to the efforts of Ohioans and other Americans, the United States emerged from World War II triumphant.



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