This is Big Book

  • French Macarons Recipe - Martha Stewart
  • Macaron (French Macaroon) Recipe - Allrecipes.com



A little background story about French macrons, I felt like I’ve never really perfected making them. In the past, I’ve successfully made them, but there would usually be some minor imperfections about them.  Most of the time, I’d end up with macaron shells that would be too soft, too fragile and/or have a hollow center. Hence, this is why I avoided blogging about macarons before.

But all of that changed when I finally decided to stick to a different macaron recipe! More specifically, I decided to stick to a recipe that uses weight instead of volume measures. And let me tell you, baking in general with weight instead of volume measures is pretty life-changing (okay, maybe I exaggerated too much lol). Here’s why:

While I can get away with minor measurement variations for other baking recipes, I find that it’s better to use weight instead of volume measures for macarons since making them can be finicky. Macarons can be pretty annoying to make;  I will not sugar coat that (not sure if pun was intended). But once you get the hang of it, the results are rewarding.

A little background story about French macrons, I felt like I’ve never really perfected making them. In the past, I’ve successfully made them, but there would usually be some minor imperfections about them.  Most of the time, I’d end up with macaron shells that would be too soft, too fragile and/or have a hollow center. Hence, this is why I avoided blogging about macarons before.

But all of that changed when I finally decided to stick to a different macaron recipe! More specifically, I decided to stick to a recipe that uses weight instead of volume measures. And let me tell you, baking in general with weight instead of volume measures is pretty life-changing (okay, maybe I exaggerated too much lol). Here’s why:

While I can get away with minor measurement variations for other baking recipes, I find that it’s better to use weight instead of volume measures for macarons since making them can be finicky. Macarons can be pretty annoying to make;  I will not sugar coat that (not sure if pun was intended). But once you get the hang of it, the results are rewarding.

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F using the convection setting. Line 3 baking sheets with silicone mats. Measure the confectioners' sugar and almond flour by spooning them into measuring cups and leveling with a knife. Transfer to a bowl; whisk to combine.

Sift the sugar-almond flour mixture, a little at a time, through a fine-mesh sieve into a large bowl, pressing with a rubber spatula to pass through as much as possible. It will take a while, and up to 2 tablespoons of coarse almond flour may be left; just toss it.

Beat the egg whites, cream of tartar and salt with a mixer on medium speed until frothy. Increase the speed to medium high; gradually add the superfine sugar and beat until stiff and shiny, about 5 more minutes.

A little background story about French macrons, I felt like I’ve never really perfected making them. In the past, I’ve successfully made them, but there would usually be some minor imperfections about them.  Most of the time, I’d end up with macaron shells that would be too soft, too fragile and/or have a hollow center. Hence, this is why I avoided blogging about macarons before.

But all of that changed when I finally decided to stick to a different macaron recipe! More specifically, I decided to stick to a recipe that uses weight instead of volume measures. And let me tell you, baking in general with weight instead of volume measures is pretty life-changing (okay, maybe I exaggerated too much lol). Here’s why:

While I can get away with minor measurement variations for other baking recipes, I find that it’s better to use weight instead of volume measures for macarons since making them can be finicky. Macarons can be pretty annoying to make;  I will not sugar coat that (not sure if pun was intended). But once you get the hang of it, the results are rewarding.

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F using the convection setting. Line 3 baking sheets with silicone mats. Measure the confectioners' sugar and almond flour by spooning them into measuring cups and leveling with a knife. Transfer to a bowl; whisk to combine.

Sift the sugar-almond flour mixture, a little at a time, through a fine-mesh sieve into a large bowl, pressing with a rubber spatula to pass through as much as possible. It will take a while, and up to 2 tablespoons of coarse almond flour may be left; just toss it.

Beat the egg whites, cream of tartar and salt with a mixer on medium speed until frothy. Increase the speed to medium high; gradually add the superfine sugar and beat until stiff and shiny, about 5 more minutes.

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