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  • Teaching Cues for Sport Skills for Secondary School.
  • Fronske, Teaching Cues for Sport Skills for Secondary.



A monthly summary of the latest Strength & Conditioning, Nutrition, Coaching, Recovery, Technology, and Youth Development research.

Although coaching is often referred to as an “art”, science is beginning to demonstrate that some coaching methods may be better than others, re-affirming the concept of evidence-based coaching. This article explicitly discusses how the type of coaching cue (i.e., external, internal, or normal) a coach uses can have a profound effect on the athlete’s short- and long-term performance, including their ability to retain the skill (i.e., perform it with the same quality at a later date). In most circumstances studied, external coaching cues appear to be more effective than both internal and normal cues for performance, skill development and retention.

Coaching cues are snippets of information, or task-orientated information, used to teach the athlete how to perform the task/skill [1]. Successful coaching largely depends on the coach’s ability to communicate with the athlete using simple and effective coaching cues [1]. Cues which are too long, too complex, and are quite simply just too complicated, are unlikely to teach the athlete the desired skill. As a result, a great deal of research has emerged in the past two decades which has attempted to identify the most effective coaching cues to use; with the first study being published in 1998 [2].

A monthly summary of the latest Strength & Conditioning, Nutrition, Coaching, Recovery, Technology, and Youth Development research.

Although coaching is often referred to as an “art”, science is beginning to demonstrate that some coaching methods may be better than others, re-affirming the concept of evidence-based coaching. This article explicitly discusses how the type of coaching cue (i.e., external, internal, or normal) a coach uses can have a profound effect on the athlete’s short- and long-term performance, including their ability to retain the skill (i.e., perform it with the same quality at a later date). In most circumstances studied, external coaching cues appear to be more effective than both internal and normal cues for performance, skill development and retention.

Coaching cues are snippets of information, or task-orientated information, used to teach the athlete how to perform the task/skill [1]. Successful coaching largely depends on the coach’s ability to communicate with the athlete using simple and effective coaching cues [1]. Cues which are too long, too complex, and are quite simply just too complicated, are unlikely to teach the athlete the desired skill. As a result, a great deal of research has emerged in the past two decades which has attempted to identify the most effective coaching cues to use; with the first study being published in 1998 [2].

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