This is Big Book

  • A Mother for Choco - YouTube
  • A Mother for Choco - mrjonathan.com



Summary: Choco is a little bird who lives all alone and who sets off one day to find his mother.  Though bits of him match other mothers in his neighborhood, no one looks just like him. Discouraged to the point of tears, Choco finally finds a very unconventional mother to call his own.

Literary elements at work in the story: Kasza uses the sort of repeated parallel dialogue that young children love as a device to advance this simple plot. Choco greets each potential mother, excitedly points out a physical characteristic which they have in common, and asks with great hope, “Are you my mother?”  In response each mother draws attention to a way in which they differ, and Choco moves on, dejectedly.  The surprise ending, then, is even more affirming after all of Choco’s rejections.  Kasza’s simple, bright illustrations manage to inject both great emotion and light humor into the story.

How does the perspective on gender/race/culture/economics/ability make a difference to the story?  At its core, this is a story about physical difference and could easily be interpreted in light of the world’s emphasis on racial differentiation.  However, this is not a paean to diversity; instead, it suggests that outward appearance really has very little to do with the depth of relationships.  Oddly, there are no fathers in this story.

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Summary: Choco is a little bird who lives all alone and who sets off one day to find his mother.  Though bits of him match other mothers in his neighborhood, no one looks just like him. Discouraged to the point of tears, Choco finally finds a very unconventional mother to call his own.

Literary elements at work in the story: Kasza uses the sort of repeated parallel dialogue that young children love as a device to advance this simple plot. Choco greets each potential mother, excitedly points out a physical characteristic which they have in common, and asks with great hope, “Are you my mother?”  In response each mother draws attention to a way in which they differ, and Choco moves on, dejectedly.  The surprise ending, then, is even more affirming after all of Choco’s rejections.  Kasza’s simple, bright illustrations manage to inject both great emotion and light humor into the story.

How does the perspective on gender/race/culture/economics/ability make a difference to the story?  At its core, this is a story about physical difference and could easily be interpreted in light of the world’s emphasis on racial differentiation.  However, this is not a paean to diversity; instead, it suggests that outward appearance really has very little to do with the depth of relationships.  Oddly, there are no fathers in this story.



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