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  • To be, or not to be - Wikipedia
  • To sleep, perchance to dream - eNotes Shakespeare Quotes



This phrase occurs in the most celebrated soliloquy of Prince Hamlet in the Shakespearean play of the same name, Hamlet . It starts with another famous phrase, “To be or not to be,” in Act-III, Scene-I. It reads as, “To sleep – perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub…” Despondent and feigning, Prince Hamlet contemplates suicide and death. This speech explains his hesitation to immediately exact revenge upon the murderer of his father, King Hamlet.

“Sleep” here represents death, and “perchance” means perhaps. The literal meaning of this quote is that death is a better choice to end the sufferings of one’s life. It implies that unconsciousness or dreamless sleep, after death, would be ideal to be rid of troubles and sufferings in life. Since dreams emphasize tenuousness and uncertainty, and convey a sense of ignorance about the future, Prince Hamlet longs for dreamless sleep, as it would be much better to free him from his worries upon his death.

The use of this phrase is common in literature, as it contains highly poetic and evocative language. It is normally found in literary works. However, in everyday life dejected lovers use it to express their desperation in love. Many people, who are extremely hopeless of being unsuccessful in life, also use it, as it would be better to die peacefully than to have troubling dreams. Cynic philosophers also use this phrase in their everyday conversation.

Вероятно, серверы Твиттера перегружены или в их работе произошел кратковременный сбой. Повторите попытку или посетите страницу Статус Твиттера , чтобы узнать более подробную информацию.

Эта настройка позволяет добавлять в твиты информацию о местоположении, например название города и точные координаты, на веб-сайте и в сторонних приложениях. Вы можете удалить сведения о местоположении из своих твитов в любое время. Подробнее

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My first encounter with Charles Beaumont came in the form of worn-out 90s VHS tapes. I was ten and about to enter another dimension, one narrated by Rod Serling. As with Ray Bradbury and Richard Matheson, both Twilight Zone writers, Beaumont became a childhood influence without a name – after all, what girl stops to read the credits on a  VHS tape?

Perchance to Dream is a new collection by Penguin Classics of Charles Beaumont’s work. Veering between horror, science fiction, dark fantasy and the weird, Beaumont’s stories examine grand themes of death, humanity and sex, all with a sinister and malevolent echo through 1950s America.

With an introduction by Ray Bradbury and afterward by William Shatner, it’s clear that Charles Beaumont bounded enthusiastically towards fiction, taking small ideas and spinning them into stories with sharp endings. He was a remarkably prescient writer, forecasting everything from internet dating to curved televisions in homes to wearable devices. The importance of the collection is not to be understated; Beaumont died tragically in his 30s from what is thought to be early onset Alzheimer’s disease. Before this collection, it was difficult to find many of his stories in print or online.

One of the most frequently used words in the works of Shakespeare is ‘dream’, hence this page presents a list of Shakespeare’s dream quotes . A dominant recurring theme in Shakespeare’s works is the opposition of fantasy and reality, and often the confusion of the two. This career-long fascination is summed up when the wizard Prospero, in Shakespeare’s fantasy play, The Tempest , utters what was to become Shakespeare’s most famous dream quote, and perhaps the most famous dream quote of all time: ‘We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life is rounded with a sleep.’

Dream quote 1 ‘My troublous dreams this night doth make me sad.’ is not from King Lear. It come from Henry VI part 2 act 1, scene 2. It is spoken by The Duke of Gloucester.
http://shakespeare.mit.edu/2henryvi/2henryvi.1.2.html

This phrase occurs in the most celebrated soliloquy of Prince Hamlet in the Shakespearean play of the same name, Hamlet . It starts with another famous phrase, “To be or not to be,” in Act-III, Scene-I. It reads as, “To sleep – perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub…” Despondent and feigning, Prince Hamlet contemplates suicide and death. This speech explains his hesitation to immediately exact revenge upon the murderer of his father, King Hamlet.

“Sleep” here represents death, and “perchance” means perhaps. The literal meaning of this quote is that death is a better choice to end the sufferings of one’s life. It implies that unconsciousness or dreamless sleep, after death, would be ideal to be rid of troubles and sufferings in life. Since dreams emphasize tenuousness and uncertainty, and convey a sense of ignorance about the future, Prince Hamlet longs for dreamless sleep, as it would be much better to free him from his worries upon his death.

The use of this phrase is common in literature, as it contains highly poetic and evocative language. It is normally found in literary works. However, in everyday life dejected lovers use it to express their desperation in love. Many people, who are extremely hopeless of being unsuccessful in life, also use it, as it would be better to die peacefully than to have troubling dreams. Cynic philosophers also use this phrase in their everyday conversation.

This phrase occurs in the most celebrated soliloquy of Prince Hamlet in the Shakespearean play of the same name, Hamlet . It starts with another famous phrase, “To be or not to be,” in Act-III, Scene-I. It reads as, “To sleep – perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub…” Despondent and feigning, Prince Hamlet contemplates suicide and death. This speech explains his hesitation to immediately exact revenge upon the murderer of his father, King Hamlet.

“Sleep” here represents death, and “perchance” means perhaps. The literal meaning of this quote is that death is a better choice to end the sufferings of one’s life. It implies that unconsciousness or dreamless sleep, after death, would be ideal to be rid of troubles and sufferings in life. Since dreams emphasize tenuousness and uncertainty, and convey a sense of ignorance about the future, Prince Hamlet longs for dreamless sleep, as it would be much better to free him from his worries upon his death.

The use of this phrase is common in literature, as it contains highly poetic and evocative language. It is normally found in literary works. However, in everyday life dejected lovers use it to express their desperation in love. Many people, who are extremely hopeless of being unsuccessful in life, also use it, as it would be better to die peacefully than to have troubling dreams. Cynic philosophers also use this phrase in their everyday conversation.

Вероятно, серверы Твиттера перегружены или в их работе произошел кратковременный сбой. Повторите попытку или посетите страницу Статус Твиттера , чтобы узнать более подробную информацию.

Эта настройка позволяет добавлять в твиты информацию о местоположении, например название города и точные координаты, на веб-сайте и в сторонних приложениях. Вы можете удалить сведения о местоположении из своих твитов в любое время. Подробнее

eNotes.com will help you with any book or any question. Our summaries and analyses are written by experts, and your questions are answered by real teachers.

My first encounter with Charles Beaumont came in the form of worn-out 90s VHS tapes. I was ten and about to enter another dimension, one narrated by Rod Serling. As with Ray Bradbury and Richard Matheson, both Twilight Zone writers, Beaumont became a childhood influence without a name – after all, what girl stops to read the credits on a  VHS tape?

Perchance to Dream is a new collection by Penguin Classics of Charles Beaumont’s work. Veering between horror, science fiction, dark fantasy and the weird, Beaumont’s stories examine grand themes of death, humanity and sex, all with a sinister and malevolent echo through 1950s America.

With an introduction by Ray Bradbury and afterward by William Shatner, it’s clear that Charles Beaumont bounded enthusiastically towards fiction, taking small ideas and spinning them into stories with sharp endings. He was a remarkably prescient writer, forecasting everything from internet dating to curved televisions in homes to wearable devices. The importance of the collection is not to be understated; Beaumont died tragically in his 30s from what is thought to be early onset Alzheimer’s disease. Before this collection, it was difficult to find many of his stories in print or online.

This phrase occurs in the most celebrated soliloquy of Prince Hamlet in the Shakespearean play of the same name, Hamlet . It starts with another famous phrase, “To be or not to be,” in Act-III, Scene-I. It reads as, “To sleep – perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub…” Despondent and feigning, Prince Hamlet contemplates suicide and death. This speech explains his hesitation to immediately exact revenge upon the murderer of his father, King Hamlet.

“Sleep” here represents death, and “perchance” means perhaps. The literal meaning of this quote is that death is a better choice to end the sufferings of one’s life. It implies that unconsciousness or dreamless sleep, after death, would be ideal to be rid of troubles and sufferings in life. Since dreams emphasize tenuousness and uncertainty, and convey a sense of ignorance about the future, Prince Hamlet longs for dreamless sleep, as it would be much better to free him from his worries upon his death.

The use of this phrase is common in literature, as it contains highly poetic and evocative language. It is normally found in literary works. However, in everyday life dejected lovers use it to express their desperation in love. Many people, who are extremely hopeless of being unsuccessful in life, also use it, as it would be better to die peacefully than to have troubling dreams. Cynic philosophers also use this phrase in their everyday conversation.

Вероятно, серверы Твиттера перегружены или в их работе произошел кратковременный сбой. Повторите попытку или посетите страницу Статус Твиттера , чтобы узнать более подробную информацию.

Эта настройка позволяет добавлять в твиты информацию о местоположении, например название города и точные координаты, на веб-сайте и в сторонних приложениях. Вы можете удалить сведения о местоположении из своих твитов в любое время. Подробнее

This phrase occurs in the most celebrated soliloquy of Prince Hamlet in the Shakespearean play of the same name, Hamlet . It starts with another famous phrase, “To be or not to be,” in Act-III, Scene-I. It reads as, “To sleep – perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub…” Despondent and feigning, Prince Hamlet contemplates suicide and death. This speech explains his hesitation to immediately exact revenge upon the murderer of his father, King Hamlet.

“Sleep” here represents death, and “perchance” means perhaps. The literal meaning of this quote is that death is a better choice to end the sufferings of one’s life. It implies that unconsciousness or dreamless sleep, after death, would be ideal to be rid of troubles and sufferings in life. Since dreams emphasize tenuousness and uncertainty, and convey a sense of ignorance about the future, Prince Hamlet longs for dreamless sleep, as it would be much better to free him from his worries upon his death.

The use of this phrase is common in literature, as it contains highly poetic and evocative language. It is normally found in literary works. However, in everyday life dejected lovers use it to express their desperation in love. Many people, who are extremely hopeless of being unsuccessful in life, also use it, as it would be better to die peacefully than to have troubling dreams. Cynic philosophers also use this phrase in their everyday conversation.

Вероятно, серверы Твиттера перегружены или в их работе произошел кратковременный сбой. Повторите попытку или посетите страницу Статус Твиттера , чтобы узнать более подробную информацию.

Эта настройка позволяет добавлять в твиты информацию о местоположении, например название города и точные координаты, на веб-сайте и в сторонних приложениях. Вы можете удалить сведения о местоположении из своих твитов в любое время. Подробнее

eNotes.com will help you with any book or any question. Our summaries and analyses are written by experts, and your questions are answered by real teachers.



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