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Product specifications are obtained from third parties, and while we make every effort to assure the accuracy of product information, we do not assume any liability for inaccuracies. Store ratings and product reviews are written and submitted by online shoppers to assist you as you shop. They do not reflect our opinions. We take no responsibility for the content of ratings and reviews submitted by users.

I watched Charlie Chaplin ‘s century-old short,  The Immigrant  (1917) days before I saw the announcement for the Food in Film Blogathon and took it as a sign. The movie, which according to several sources was Chaplin’s favorite of the Mutual shorts, features a memorable scene during which the Little Tramp has a meal, a simple enough endeavor for most people, but which becomes art in the hands of Charlie Chaplin. That scene in  The Immigrant  is reminiscent of others I enjoy immensely in later Chaplin movies and so the idea to dedicate this entry to Chaplin’s art of the meal was born.

Let me begin my discussion of Chaplin’s art of the meal with  The Immigrant  since that’s the movie that came to mind when considering food in film. This movie stars Chaplin as the title character and was written and directed by him as were all of the other movies mentioned here. The Tramp is the title character alongside frequent co-star, Edna Purviance , both of whom take a boat to the U.S. in search of freedom and a better life. Neither of those come easily for the Tramp in this as you might expect, but the journey is often touching and always entertaining. The Little Tramp meets and falls in love with the girl and gets into a bit of trouble along the way.

That scene in  The Immigrant  exemplifies many of the themes Chaplin was able to convey in his meal scenes as well as all of the Tramp’s attributes to include, “A tramp, a gentleman, a poet, a dreamer, a lonely fellow, always hopeful of romance and adventure.” (Chaplin) We’d see and recognize these in many of his later, more popular movies, but are prevalent in his shorts as well.

Charlie Chaplin, Photographed by Edward Steichen, 1931.
Check out Salvador Dali’s portrait of Luis Bunuel here

Check out a photo of Sergei Eisenstein holding up something special  here and Charlie Chaplin upon leaving the US (by Richard Avedon) here .

After 35 shorts with the Keystone company, Chaplin was made an offer at the  Essanay  company, at a substantially higher salary than Sennet was willing to pay.  Chaplin’s artistry continued to develop during his year at Essanay, turning out fifteen shorts, with a sixteenth patched together from studio out-takes after he had left, a sure sign of his box-office wizardry.

By now, he was years late to finish his First National contract and was eager to start making films for  United Artists,  which he had founded in 1919 with  Douglas Fairbanks ,  Mary Pickford  and  D.W. Griffith . In rapid order, he released  The   Idle Class ,  Pay Day   and  The Pilgrim ,  a series of straightforward comedy shorts,to finish out the contract.

Chaplin astonished audiences yet again with his first United Artists feature.  A Woman of Paris  (1923) broke new ground in three ways: it was a drama; Chaplin was not the star (in fact he only made a cameo appearance); and it employed a much more realistic style of acting than any previous Hollywood dramatic film. In its day it was considered a great screen achievement—one of the greatest films up until that point. Its melodramatic story was a sort of cross between the real life story of gold-digging party girl  Peggy Hopkins Joyce  and  Our Lady of the Camillias.  Charlie’s return to the screen as the tramp (after a four year absence) was equally innovative.

Prices are provided by the merchants. We assume no responsibility for accuracy of price information provided by merchants. Please alert us to any pricing discrepancies and we will alert the merchant. Sales taxes are estimated at the zip code level. Shipping costs are estimates. Please check store for exact shipping costs. To learn more about why certain stores are listed on the site, click here

Product specifications are obtained from third parties, and while we make every effort to assure the accuracy of product information, we do not assume any liability for inaccuracies. Store ratings and product reviews are written and submitted by online shoppers to assist you as you shop. They do not reflect our opinions. We take no responsibility for the content of ratings and reviews submitted by users.

Prices are provided by the merchants. We assume no responsibility for accuracy of price information provided by merchants. Please alert us to any pricing discrepancies and we will alert the merchant. Sales taxes are estimated at the zip code level. Shipping costs are estimates. Please check store for exact shipping costs. To learn more about why certain stores are listed on the site, click here

Product specifications are obtained from third parties, and while we make every effort to assure the accuracy of product information, we do not assume any liability for inaccuracies. Store ratings and product reviews are written and submitted by online shoppers to assist you as you shop. They do not reflect our opinions. We take no responsibility for the content of ratings and reviews submitted by users.

I watched Charlie Chaplin ‘s century-old short,  The Immigrant  (1917) days before I saw the announcement for the Food in Film Blogathon and took it as a sign. The movie, which according to several sources was Chaplin’s favorite of the Mutual shorts, features a memorable scene during which the Little Tramp has a meal, a simple enough endeavor for most people, but which becomes art in the hands of Charlie Chaplin. That scene in  The Immigrant  is reminiscent of others I enjoy immensely in later Chaplin movies and so the idea to dedicate this entry to Chaplin’s art of the meal was born.

Let me begin my discussion of Chaplin’s art of the meal with  The Immigrant  since that’s the movie that came to mind when considering food in film. This movie stars Chaplin as the title character and was written and directed by him as were all of the other movies mentioned here. The Tramp is the title character alongside frequent co-star, Edna Purviance , both of whom take a boat to the U.S. in search of freedom and a better life. Neither of those come easily for the Tramp in this as you might expect, but the journey is often touching and always entertaining. The Little Tramp meets and falls in love with the girl and gets into a bit of trouble along the way.

That scene in  The Immigrant  exemplifies many of the themes Chaplin was able to convey in his meal scenes as well as all of the Tramp’s attributes to include, “A tramp, a gentleman, a poet, a dreamer, a lonely fellow, always hopeful of romance and adventure.” (Chaplin) We’d see and recognize these in many of his later, more popular movies, but are prevalent in his shorts as well.

Charlie Chaplin, Photographed by Edward Steichen, 1931.
Check out Salvador Dali’s portrait of Luis Bunuel here

Check out a photo of Sergei Eisenstein holding up something special  here and Charlie Chaplin upon leaving the US (by Richard Avedon) here .

After 35 shorts with the Keystone company, Chaplin was made an offer at the  Essanay  company, at a substantially higher salary than Sennet was willing to pay.  Chaplin’s artistry continued to develop during his year at Essanay, turning out fifteen shorts, with a sixteenth patched together from studio out-takes after he had left, a sure sign of his box-office wizardry.

By now, he was years late to finish his First National contract and was eager to start making films for  United Artists,  which he had founded in 1919 with  Douglas Fairbanks ,  Mary Pickford  and  D.W. Griffith . In rapid order, he released  The   Idle Class ,  Pay Day   and  The Pilgrim ,  a series of straightforward comedy shorts,to finish out the contract.

Chaplin astonished audiences yet again with his first United Artists feature.  A Woman of Paris  (1923) broke new ground in three ways: it was a drama; Chaplin was not the star (in fact he only made a cameo appearance); and it employed a much more realistic style of acting than any previous Hollywood dramatic film. In its day it was considered a great screen achievement—one of the greatest films up until that point. Its melodramatic story was a sort of cross between the real life story of gold-digging party girl  Peggy Hopkins Joyce  and  Our Lady of the Camillias.  Charlie’s return to the screen as the tramp (after a four year absence) was equally innovative.

Filmed mostly in 1920, The Kid utilizes more historic settings and extant locations than any other Chaplin film. 95 years later you can still visit Edna Purviance’s Dickensian maternity ward, the mansion (later owned by Muhammad Ali) where she abandons her baby, and the Hollywood alley where Charlie first encounters the abandoned child. To celebrate the Criterion Collection’s Blu-ray release of  The Kid , this post provides a broad overview of the film, covered more fully in my book Silent Traces . (More great news – the Janus Films restoration of The Kid will premiere at this year’s TCM Classic Film Festival .)

All images from Chaplin films made from 1918 onwards, copyright © Roy Export Company Establishment. CHARLES CHAPLIN, CHAPLIN, and the LITTLE TRAMP, photographs from and the names of Mr. Chaplin’s films are trademarks and/or service marks of Bubbles Incorporated SA and/or Roy Export Company Establishment. Used with permission.

Fascinating, John! I could spend every single day reading about your discoveries and never grow complacent about your fine work. LOVE!

Prices are provided by the merchants. We assume no responsibility for accuracy of price information provided by merchants. Please alert us to any pricing discrepancies and we will alert the merchant. Sales taxes are estimated at the zip code level. Shipping costs are estimates. Please check store for exact shipping costs. To learn more about why certain stores are listed on the site, click here

Product specifications are obtained from third parties, and while we make every effort to assure the accuracy of product information, we do not assume any liability for inaccuracies. Store ratings and product reviews are written and submitted by online shoppers to assist you as you shop. They do not reflect our opinions. We take no responsibility for the content of ratings and reviews submitted by users.

I watched Charlie Chaplin ‘s century-old short,  The Immigrant  (1917) days before I saw the announcement for the Food in Film Blogathon and took it as a sign. The movie, which according to several sources was Chaplin’s favorite of the Mutual shorts, features a memorable scene during which the Little Tramp has a meal, a simple enough endeavor for most people, but which becomes art in the hands of Charlie Chaplin. That scene in  The Immigrant  is reminiscent of others I enjoy immensely in later Chaplin movies and so the idea to dedicate this entry to Chaplin’s art of the meal was born.

Let me begin my discussion of Chaplin’s art of the meal with  The Immigrant  since that’s the movie that came to mind when considering food in film. This movie stars Chaplin as the title character and was written and directed by him as were all of the other movies mentioned here. The Tramp is the title character alongside frequent co-star, Edna Purviance , both of whom take a boat to the U.S. in search of freedom and a better life. Neither of those come easily for the Tramp in this as you might expect, but the journey is often touching and always entertaining. The Little Tramp meets and falls in love with the girl and gets into a bit of trouble along the way.

That scene in  The Immigrant  exemplifies many of the themes Chaplin was able to convey in his meal scenes as well as all of the Tramp’s attributes to include, “A tramp, a gentleman, a poet, a dreamer, a lonely fellow, always hopeful of romance and adventure.” (Chaplin) We’d see and recognize these in many of his later, more popular movies, but are prevalent in his shorts as well.

Prices are provided by the merchants. We assume no responsibility for accuracy of price information provided by merchants. Please alert us to any pricing discrepancies and we will alert the merchant. Sales taxes are estimated at the zip code level. Shipping costs are estimates. Please check store for exact shipping costs. To learn more about why certain stores are listed on the site, click here

Product specifications are obtained from third parties, and while we make every effort to assure the accuracy of product information, we do not assume any liability for inaccuracies. Store ratings and product reviews are written and submitted by online shoppers to assist you as you shop. They do not reflect our opinions. We take no responsibility for the content of ratings and reviews submitted by users.

I watched Charlie Chaplin ‘s century-old short,  The Immigrant  (1917) days before I saw the announcement for the Food in Film Blogathon and took it as a sign. The movie, which according to several sources was Chaplin’s favorite of the Mutual shorts, features a memorable scene during which the Little Tramp has a meal, a simple enough endeavor for most people, but which becomes art in the hands of Charlie Chaplin. That scene in  The Immigrant  is reminiscent of others I enjoy immensely in later Chaplin movies and so the idea to dedicate this entry to Chaplin’s art of the meal was born.

Let me begin my discussion of Chaplin’s art of the meal with  The Immigrant  since that’s the movie that came to mind when considering food in film. This movie stars Chaplin as the title character and was written and directed by him as were all of the other movies mentioned here. The Tramp is the title character alongside frequent co-star, Edna Purviance , both of whom take a boat to the U.S. in search of freedom and a better life. Neither of those come easily for the Tramp in this as you might expect, but the journey is often touching and always entertaining. The Little Tramp meets and falls in love with the girl and gets into a bit of trouble along the way.

That scene in  The Immigrant  exemplifies many of the themes Chaplin was able to convey in his meal scenes as well as all of the Tramp’s attributes to include, “A tramp, a gentleman, a poet, a dreamer, a lonely fellow, always hopeful of romance and adventure.” (Chaplin) We’d see and recognize these in many of his later, more popular movies, but are prevalent in his shorts as well.

Charlie Chaplin, Photographed by Edward Steichen, 1931.
Check out Salvador Dali’s portrait of Luis Bunuel here

Check out a photo of Sergei Eisenstein holding up something special  here and Charlie Chaplin upon leaving the US (by Richard Avedon) here .



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