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  • A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson - amazon.com
  • A God in Ruins: A Novel - Kindle edition by Kate Atkinson.



WINNER OF THE 2015 COSTA NOVEL AWARD
A God in Ruins relates the life of Teddy Todd – would-be poet, heroic World War II bomber pilot, husband, father, and grandfather – as he navigates the perils and progress of the 20th century. For all Teddy endures in battle, his greatest challenge will be to face living in a future he never expected to have.

This gripping, often deliriously funny yet emotionally devastating book looks at war – that great fall of Man from grace – and the effect it has, not only on those who live through it, but on the lives of the subsequent generations. It is also about the infinite magic of fiction.Those who loved the bestselling Life After Life will recognise Teddy as Ursula Todd’s adored younger brother – but for those who have not read it, A God in Ruins stands fully on its own. Few will dispute that it proves once again that Kate Atkinson is one of the most exceptional novelists of our age.

"A God in Ruins" by Kate Atkinson is a companion to her award-winning novel "Life After Life" and follows the life of Ursula Todd's brother Teddy.

"A God in Ruins" by Kate Atkinson is a companion to her award-winning novel "Life After Life" and follows the life of Ursula Todd's brother Teddy.

Kate Atkinson just keeps getting better. That's a hell of a thing to say of someone whose debut novel, "Behind the Scenes at the Museum," nabbed the 1995 Whitbread Book of the Year Prize from under Salman Rushdie's nose, provoking reactionary hand-wringing and sexist screeds from Britain's literary press. After a decade of impressively intricate Jackson Brodie mysteries, 2013's "Life After Life" represented an ambitious shift in tone, snagging her first major literary award in decades, another Costa (formerly Whitbread) award. The follow-up, "A God in Ruins," is a stunner.

WINNER OF THE 2015 COSTA NOVEL AWARD
A God in Ruins relates the life of Teddy Todd – would-be poet, heroic World War II bomber pilot, husband, father, and grandfather – as he navigates the perils and progress of the 20th century. For all Teddy endures in battle, his greatest challenge will be to face living in a future he never expected to have.

This gripping, often deliriously funny yet emotionally devastating book looks at war – that great fall of Man from grace – and the effect it has, not only on those who live through it, but on the lives of the subsequent generations. It is also about the infinite magic of fiction.Those who loved the bestselling Life After Life will recognise Teddy as Ursula Todd’s adored younger brother – but for those who have not read it, A God in Ruins stands fully on its own. Few will dispute that it proves once again that Kate Atkinson is one of the most exceptional novelists of our age.

"A God in Ruins" by Kate Atkinson is a companion to her award-winning novel "Life After Life" and follows the life of Ursula Todd's brother Teddy.

"A God in Ruins" by Kate Atkinson is a companion to her award-winning novel "Life After Life" and follows the life of Ursula Todd's brother Teddy.

Kate Atkinson just keeps getting better. That's a hell of a thing to say of someone whose debut novel, "Behind the Scenes at the Museum," nabbed the 1995 Whitbread Book of the Year Prize from under Salman Rushdie's nose, provoking reactionary hand-wringing and sexist screeds from Britain's literary press. After a decade of impressively intricate Jackson Brodie mysteries, 2013's "Life After Life" represented an ambitious shift in tone, snagging her first major literary award in decades, another Costa (formerly Whitbread) award. The follow-up, "A God in Ruins," is a stunner.

Set between the 1940s and 2008, the book follows the life of Quinn Patrick O'Connell, the fictional Democratic candidate for the 2008 United States Presidency, his family, and the life of his opponent, Thornton Tomtree. The book climaxes with the election campaign and its results.

Quinn Patrick O'Connell was detached from his parents at the age of one and adopted by the Irish O'Connell family at the age of three. He has lived in a ranch in Colorado and studied in the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs . He went on to become a Colorado state senator, and later Governor of Colorado, gun control being his main platform.

During this time he has had two relationships, with Greer Little and Rita Maldonado. Both women lead him through his election campaign and set him up for the 2008 presidency.

The novel has profound compassion for the English soldiers, “birds thrown against a wall, in the hope that eventually, if there were enough birds, they would break that wall.” Especially it loves Teddy, who is cheerful and plucky and brave in the manner of the Scouts with whom he spent his youth. Who is frugal and gentle to his resentful daughter and later tends his own bees and chickens. “I’m old-fashioned,” Teddy tells the repellent Viola, who with her drum circles and Magick and abhorrent, neglectful parenting could represent the folly of rebellion for its own sake. “I don’t think that’s a bad thing.”

The upshot is that, throughout, it’s hard to shake the uncanny sense that you are meeting characters, seeing scenes, as they are in the process of being imagined by someone . Everywhere are strange echoes and contiguities, wisps of a previous setting threaded into a new one, as when the “armour” of “good manners” Teddy is told to “don anew every morning” reappears—anew!—in Viola’s conversation with her son several pages (and half a century) later. Or the red thread marking a flight path in 1945 comes back as the emergency cord dangling from the ceiling of the retirement home Teddy has moved to in 1993.

But if A God in Ruins suffers from a touch too much tidiness, if it overcalculates the glories of a sensitive “artistic soul,” those flaws pale next to Atkinson’s wit, humanity, and wisdom. In her afterword, she alludes to the “great conceit hidden at the heart of the book to do with fiction and the imagination, which is revealed only at the end.” It is a great conceit. But it’s also a testament to the novel’s craft and power that the conceit isn’t what you’ll remember when it’s over.

WINNER OF THE 2015 COSTA NOVEL AWARD
A God in Ruins relates the life of Teddy Todd – would-be poet, heroic World War II bomber pilot, husband, father, and grandfather – as he navigates the perils and progress of the 20th century. For all Teddy endures in battle, his greatest challenge will be to face living in a future he never expected to have.

This gripping, often deliriously funny yet emotionally devastating book looks at war – that great fall of Man from grace – and the effect it has, not only on those who live through it, but on the lives of the subsequent generations. It is also about the infinite magic of fiction.Those who loved the bestselling Life After Life will recognise Teddy as Ursula Todd’s adored younger brother – but for those who have not read it, A God in Ruins stands fully on its own. Few will dispute that it proves once again that Kate Atkinson is one of the most exceptional novelists of our age.

"A God in Ruins" by Kate Atkinson is a companion to her award-winning novel "Life After Life" and follows the life of Ursula Todd's brother Teddy.

"A God in Ruins" by Kate Atkinson is a companion to her award-winning novel "Life After Life" and follows the life of Ursula Todd's brother Teddy.

Kate Atkinson just keeps getting better. That's a hell of a thing to say of someone whose debut novel, "Behind the Scenes at the Museum," nabbed the 1995 Whitbread Book of the Year Prize from under Salman Rushdie's nose, provoking reactionary hand-wringing and sexist screeds from Britain's literary press. After a decade of impressively intricate Jackson Brodie mysteries, 2013's "Life After Life" represented an ambitious shift in tone, snagging her first major literary award in decades, another Costa (formerly Whitbread) award. The follow-up, "A God in Ruins," is a stunner.

Set between the 1940s and 2008, the book follows the life of Quinn Patrick O'Connell, the fictional Democratic candidate for the 2008 United States Presidency, his family, and the life of his opponent, Thornton Tomtree. The book climaxes with the election campaign and its results.

Quinn Patrick O'Connell was detached from his parents at the age of one and adopted by the Irish O'Connell family at the age of three. He has lived in a ranch in Colorado and studied in the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs . He went on to become a Colorado state senator, and later Governor of Colorado, gun control being his main platform.

During this time he has had two relationships, with Greer Little and Rita Maldonado. Both women lead him through his election campaign and set him up for the 2008 presidency.

WINNER OF THE 2015 COSTA NOVEL AWARD
A God in Ruins relates the life of Teddy Todd – would-be poet, heroic World War II bomber pilot, husband, father, and grandfather – as he navigates the perils and progress of the 20th century. For all Teddy endures in battle, his greatest challenge will be to face living in a future he never expected to have.

This gripping, often deliriously funny yet emotionally devastating book looks at war – that great fall of Man from grace – and the effect it has, not only on those who live through it, but on the lives of the subsequent generations. It is also about the infinite magic of fiction.Those who loved the bestselling Life After Life will recognise Teddy as Ursula Todd’s adored younger brother – but for those who have not read it, A God in Ruins stands fully on its own. Few will dispute that it proves once again that Kate Atkinson is one of the most exceptional novelists of our age.



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