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"quantity having magnitude and direction," 1704, from Latin vector "one who carries or conveys, carrier," from past participle stem of vehere "carry, convey" (see vehicle ).

A quantity, such as the velocity of an object or the force acting on an object, that has both magnitude and direction. Compare scalar .

In physics and mathematics , any quantity with both a magnitude and a direction. For example, velocity is a vector because it describes both how fast something is moving and in what direction it is moving. Because velocity is a vector, other quantities in which velocity is a factor, such as acceleration and momentum , are vectors also.

From Latin vector ( “ carrier, transporter ” ) , from vehō ( “ I carry, I transport, I bear ” ) .

vector ( third-person singular simple present vectors , present participle vectoring , simple past and past participle vectored )

"quantity having magnitude and direction," 1704, from Latin vector "one who carries or conveys, carrier," from past participle stem of vehere "carry, convey" (see vehicle ).

A quantity, such as the velocity of an object or the force acting on an object, that has both magnitude and direction. Compare scalar .

In physics and mathematics , any quantity with both a magnitude and a direction. For example, velocity is a vector because it describes both how fast something is moving and in what direction it is moving. Because velocity is a vector, other quantities in which velocity is a factor, such as acceleration and momentum , are vectors also.

From Latin vector ( “ carrier, transporter ” ) , from vehō ( “ I carry, I transport, I bear ” ) .

vector ( third-person singular simple present vectors , present participle vectoring , simple past and past participle vectored )

Vector , in physics, a quantity that has both magnitude and direction. It is typically represented by an arrow whose direction is the same as that of the quantity and whose length is proportional to the quantity’s magnitude. Although a vector has magnitude and direction, it does not have position. That is, as long as its length is not changed, a vector is not altered if it is displaced parallel to itself.

In contrast to vectors, ordinary quantities that have a magnitude but not a direction are called scalars . For example, displacement , velocity , and acceleration are vector quantities, while speed (the magnitude of velocity), time, and mass are scalars.

The other rules of vector manipulation are subtraction, multiplication by a scalar, scalar multiplication (also known as the dot product or inner product), vector multiplication (also known as the cross product), and differentiation. There is no operation that corresponds to dividing by a vector. See vector analysis for a description of all of these rules.

"quantity having magnitude and direction," 1704, from Latin vector "one who carries or conveys, carrier," from past participle stem of vehere "carry, convey" (see vehicle ).

A quantity, such as the velocity of an object or the force acting on an object, that has both magnitude and direction. Compare scalar .

In physics and mathematics , any quantity with both a magnitude and a direction. For example, velocity is a vector because it describes both how fast something is moving and in what direction it is moving. Because velocity is a vector, other quantities in which velocity is a factor, such as acceleration and momentum , are vectors also.



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