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Two wrongs don’t make a right. That idiom may be a cliche, but it perfectly applies to many situations of so-called “reverse racism.”

Instead of celebrating the accomplishment, however, the high school graduate made a sick move against the school district: She’s suing the school because she had to share the graduation stage with a white girl, who also earned a co-valedictorian title.

According to The Washington Post , Jasmine Shepard graduated from Cleveland High School in Mississippi last spring. Both she and a white student were given co-valedictorian honors, but Shepard and her family are still bitter about the shared title even a year later.

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Two wrongs don’t make a right. That idiom may be a cliche, but it perfectly applies to many situations of so-called “reverse racism.”

Instead of celebrating the accomplishment, however, the high school graduate made a sick move against the school district: She’s suing the school because she had to share the graduation stage with a white girl, who also earned a co-valedictorian title.

According to The Washington Post , Jasmine Shepard graduated from Cleveland High School in Mississippi last spring. Both she and a white student were given co-valedictorian honors, but Shepard and her family are still bitter about the shared title even a year later.

Two wrongs don’t make a right. That idiom may be a cliche, but it perfectly applies to many situations of so-called “reverse racism.”

Instead of celebrating the accomplishment, however, the high school graduate made a sick move against the school district: She’s suing the school because she had to share the graduation stage with a white girl, who also earned a co-valedictorian title.

According to The Washington Post , Jasmine Shepard graduated from Cleveland High School in Mississippi last spring. Both she and a white student were given co-valedictorian honors, but Shepard and her family are still bitter about the shared title even a year later.

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

What becomes of high school valedictorians? It’s what every parent wishes their teenager to be. Mom says study hard and you’ll do well. And very often Mom is right.

Karen Arnold, a researcher at Boston College, followed 81 high school valedictorians and salutatorians from graduation onward to see what becomes of those who lead the academic pack. Of the 95 percent who went on to graduate college, their average GPA was 3.6, and by 1994, 60 percent had received a graduate degree. There was little debate that high school success predicted college success. Nearly 90 percent are now in professional careers with 40 percent in the highest tier jobs. They are reliable, consistent, and well-adjusted, and by all measures the majority have good lives.

But how many of these number-one high school performers go on to change the world, run the world, or impress the world? The answer seems to be clear: zero.

In Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Ireland, India, Pakistan and the United Kingdom, the title valedictorian is not used frequently. In Australia, the title is sometimes awarded to a member of a graduating university class on the basis of contribution to the school rather than academic success. The highest-ranking student in a graduating class is often referred to as dux (Latin for "leader"), and may or may not give a speech. In France the term Major de promotion ("first in class") is used, although the term is not related to any ceremonial role, as there are rarely graduation ceremonies in schools or universities.

How an individual school confers the title is typically based upon the highest grade point average . Some institutions confer the title on the class member chosen to deliver the final graduation address, regardless of the speaker's academic credentials. Historically and traditionally, however, schools confer the title upon the highest ranking graduate of the class, who thereby earns the honor of delivering the valedictory address.

Two wrongs don’t make a right. That idiom may be a cliche, but it perfectly applies to many situations of so-called “reverse racism.”

Instead of celebrating the accomplishment, however, the high school graduate made a sick move against the school district: She’s suing the school because she had to share the graduation stage with a white girl, who also earned a co-valedictorian title.

According to The Washington Post , Jasmine Shepard graduated from Cleveland High School in Mississippi last spring. Both she and a white student were given co-valedictorian honors, but Shepard and her family are still bitter about the shared title even a year later.

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

What becomes of high school valedictorians? It’s what every parent wishes their teenager to be. Mom says study hard and you’ll do well. And very often Mom is right.

Karen Arnold, a researcher at Boston College, followed 81 high school valedictorians and salutatorians from graduation onward to see what becomes of those who lead the academic pack. Of the 95 percent who went on to graduate college, their average GPA was 3.6, and by 1994, 60 percent had received a graduate degree. There was little debate that high school success predicted college success. Nearly 90 percent are now in professional careers with 40 percent in the highest tier jobs. They are reliable, consistent, and well-adjusted, and by all measures the majority have good lives.

But how many of these number-one high school performers go on to change the world, run the world, or impress the world? The answer seems to be clear: zero.



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