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June 1, 2015 (Mimesis Law) — Welcome to Fault Lines, an experiment in criminal justice thought and writing.  There are usually good arguments to be had on either side of critical issues, but writing often fails to reflect them.  We hope to fix that.  The core purpose is to illuminate issues in and around the law in a way that is comprehensible to all.

This is a big challenge, and whether we will meet it remains to be seen.  There will be writings here reflecting various perspectives on criminal law and justice, sometimes in direct conflict. There is a good chance you will find one side more persuasive, or at least more agreeable, than the other, but the intention is to give you pause to think even if you ultimately do not agree.

The key to achieving this is to present honest, rational thought, well-supported by law and/or logic, and reflecting information that adds to knowledge rather than muddies it.  We will be politically incorrect at times, as legal system doesn’t always offer inputs and outcomes that suit everyone’s personal tastes.  Consider this an overarching trigger warning. We will evoke unpleasant feelings from time to time.  If that’s more than you can take, you may prefer to go elsewhere for information and commentary.

The San Andreas Fault is a continental transform fault that extends roughly 1,200 kilometers (750 mi) through California . [1] It forms the tectonic boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate , and its motion is right-lateral strike-slip (horizontal). The fault divides into three segments, each with different characteristics and a different degree of earthquake risk. The slip rate along the fault ranges from 20 to 35 mm (0.79 to 1.38 in)/yr. [1]

The fault was identified in 1895 by Professor Andrew Lawson of UC Berkeley , who discovered the northern zone. It is often described as having been named after San Andreas Lake , a small body of water that was formed in a valley between the two plates. However, according to some of his reports from 1895 and 1908, Lawson actually named it after the surrounding San Andreas Valley. [2] Following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake , Lawson concluded that the fault extended all the way into southern California.

In 1953, geologist Thomas Dibblee concluded that hundreds of miles of lateral movement could occur along the fault. A project called the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) near Parkfield , Monterey County , is drilling into the fault to improve prediction and recording of future earthquakes. [ citation needed ]

June 1, 2015 (Mimesis Law) — Welcome to Fault Lines, an experiment in criminal justice thought and writing.  There are usually good arguments to be had on either side of critical issues, but writing often fails to reflect them.  We hope to fix that.  The core purpose is to illuminate issues in and around the law in a way that is comprehensible to all.

This is a big challenge, and whether we will meet it remains to be seen.  There will be writings here reflecting various perspectives on criminal law and justice, sometimes in direct conflict. There is a good chance you will find one side more persuasive, or at least more agreeable, than the other, but the intention is to give you pause to think even if you ultimately do not agree.

The key to achieving this is to present honest, rational thought, well-supported by law and/or logic, and reflecting information that adds to knowledge rather than muddies it.  We will be politically incorrect at times, as legal system doesn’t always offer inputs and outcomes that suit everyone’s personal tastes.  Consider this an overarching trigger warning. We will evoke unpleasant feelings from time to time.  If that’s more than you can take, you may prefer to go elsewhere for information and commentary.

The San Andreas Fault is a continental transform fault that extends roughly 1,200 kilometers (750 mi) through California . [1] It forms the tectonic boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate , and its motion is right-lateral strike-slip (horizontal). The fault divides into three segments, each with different characteristics and a different degree of earthquake risk. The slip rate along the fault ranges from 20 to 35 mm (0.79 to 1.38 in)/yr. [1]

The fault was identified in 1895 by Professor Andrew Lawson of UC Berkeley , who discovered the northern zone. It is often described as having been named after San Andreas Lake , a small body of water that was formed in a valley between the two plates. However, according to some of his reports from 1895 and 1908, Lawson actually named it after the surrounding San Andreas Valley. [2] Following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake , Lawson concluded that the fault extended all the way into southern California.

In 1953, geologist Thomas Dibblee concluded that hundreds of miles of lateral movement could occur along the fault. A project called the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) near Parkfield , Monterey County , is drilling into the fault to improve prediction and recording of future earthquakes. [ citation needed ]

A fault is a fracture, or break, in the Earth's crust ( lithosphere ). Some faults are active. Here, sections of rock move past each other. This sometimes makes earthquakes .

Faulting occurs when shear stress on a rock overcomes the forces which hold it together. The fracture itself is called a fault plane . When it is exposed at the Earth's surface, it may form a cliff or steep slope called a fault scarp .

The angle between the fault plane and an imaginary horizontal plane is called the dip angle of the fault. Faults may dip shallowly or steeply.

The San Andreas Fault is a continental transform fault that extends roughly 1,200 kilometers (750 mi) through California . [1] It forms the tectonic boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate , and its motion is right-lateral strike-slip (horizontal). The fault divides into three segments, each with different characteristics and a different degree of earthquake risk. The slip rate along the fault ranges from 20 to 35 mm (0.79 to 1.38 in)/yr. [1]

The fault was identified in 1895 by Professor Andrew Lawson of UC Berkeley , who discovered the northern zone. It is often described as having been named after San Andreas Lake , a small body of water that was formed in a valley between the two plates. However, according to some of his reports from 1895 and 1908, Lawson actually named it after the surrounding San Andreas Valley. [2] Following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake , Lawson concluded that the fault extended all the way into southern California.

In 1953, geologist Thomas Dibblee concluded that hundreds of miles of lateral movement could occur along the fault. A project called the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) near Parkfield , Monterey County , is drilling into the fault to improve prediction and recording of future earthquakes. [ citation needed ]

June 1, 2015 (Mimesis Law) — Welcome to Fault Lines, an experiment in criminal justice thought and writing.  There are usually good arguments to be had on either side of critical issues, but writing often fails to reflect them.  We hope to fix that.  The core purpose is to illuminate issues in and around the law in a way that is comprehensible to all.

This is a big challenge, and whether we will meet it remains to be seen.  There will be writings here reflecting various perspectives on criminal law and justice, sometimes in direct conflict. There is a good chance you will find one side more persuasive, or at least more agreeable, than the other, but the intention is to give you pause to think even if you ultimately do not agree.

The key to achieving this is to present honest, rational thought, well-supported by law and/or logic, and reflecting information that adds to knowledge rather than muddies it.  We will be politically incorrect at times, as legal system doesn’t always offer inputs and outcomes that suit everyone’s personal tastes.  Consider this an overarching trigger warning. We will evoke unpleasant feelings from time to time.  If that’s more than you can take, you may prefer to go elsewhere for information and commentary.

The San Andreas Fault is a continental transform fault that extends roughly 1,200 kilometers (750 mi) through California . [1] It forms the tectonic boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate , and its motion is right-lateral strike-slip (horizontal). The fault divides into three segments, each with different characteristics and a different degree of earthquake risk. The slip rate along the fault ranges from 20 to 35 mm (0.79 to 1.38 in)/yr. [1]

The fault was identified in 1895 by Professor Andrew Lawson of UC Berkeley , who discovered the northern zone. It is often described as having been named after San Andreas Lake , a small body of water that was formed in a valley between the two plates. However, according to some of his reports from 1895 and 1908, Lawson actually named it after the surrounding San Andreas Valley. [2] Following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake , Lawson concluded that the fault extended all the way into southern California.

In 1953, geologist Thomas Dibblee concluded that hundreds of miles of lateral movement could occur along the fault. A project called the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) near Parkfield , Monterey County , is drilling into the fault to improve prediction and recording of future earthquakes. [ citation needed ]

A fault is a fracture, or break, in the Earth's crust ( lithosphere ). Some faults are active. Here, sections of rock move past each other. This sometimes makes earthquakes .

Faulting occurs when shear stress on a rock overcomes the forces which hold it together. The fracture itself is called a fault plane . When it is exposed at the Earth's surface, it may form a cliff or steep slope called a fault scarp .

The angle between the fault plane and an imaginary horizontal plane is called the dip angle of the fault. Faults may dip shallowly or steeply.

June 1, 2015 (Mimesis Law) — Welcome to Fault Lines, an experiment in criminal justice thought and writing.  There are usually good arguments to be had on either side of critical issues, but writing often fails to reflect them.  We hope to fix that.  The core purpose is to illuminate issues in and around the law in a way that is comprehensible to all.

This is a big challenge, and whether we will meet it remains to be seen.  There will be writings here reflecting various perspectives on criminal law and justice, sometimes in direct conflict. There is a good chance you will find one side more persuasive, or at least more agreeable, than the other, but the intention is to give you pause to think even if you ultimately do not agree.

The key to achieving this is to present honest, rational thought, well-supported by law and/or logic, and reflecting information that adds to knowledge rather than muddies it.  We will be politically incorrect at times, as legal system doesn’t always offer inputs and outcomes that suit everyone’s personal tastes.  Consider this an overarching trigger warning. We will evoke unpleasant feelings from time to time.  If that’s more than you can take, you may prefer to go elsewhere for information and commentary.



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