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  • What To Cook When You Don’t Know What To Cook
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Once you realize you don't need a recipe for everything, you may find yourself cooking a lot more often. Stir-fry is a perfect example—the steps stay the same, and you can use whatever is in the fridge. The pros at Food52 walk you through the quick and easy process.

There are a few technical issues that are really the key to stir-fry success. You need to get your pan hot enough (which is generally impossible to do with a wok because of the BTUs of American stoves and the thinness of the wok metal), but a non-stick skillet will do what you need it to do perfectly.

The other misstep is when you try to cram too many ingredients into the wrong-sized pan —this is my most common stir-fry failure. Easily solvable, with a little thing called patience.

Do you ever get tired of deciding what to cook? There are days when you get indoors and are tired and feeling lazy, and you are indifferent about food. Nothing in your recipe repertoire feels quite like worth making the effort for. This is especially hard when you need to cook for other people in your family who will be feeling like eating, and wondering what is for supper.

If the decision of ‘what to have’ always rests with you, it can feel like quite a responsibility and sometimes you can just run out of ideas, or feel very uninspired by anything.

In those situations, its good to have some quick and easy ‘stand-bys’ that you will probably have the ingredients for and are going to enjoy. These meals are quite filling and comforting as well as being really easy to cook – probably just what you need on a day when cooking a meal just seems like too much trouble.

Once you realize you don't need a recipe for everything, you may find yourself cooking a lot more often. Stir-fry is a perfect example—the steps stay the same, and you can use whatever is in the fridge. The pros at Food52 walk you through the quick and easy process.

There are a few technical issues that are really the key to stir-fry success. You need to get your pan hot enough (which is generally impossible to do with a wok because of the BTUs of American stoves and the thinness of the wok metal), but a non-stick skillet will do what you need it to do perfectly.

The other misstep is when you try to cram too many ingredients into the wrong-sized pan —this is my most common stir-fry failure. Easily solvable, with a little thing called patience.

Once you realize you don't need a recipe for everything, you may find yourself cooking a lot more often. Stir-fry is a perfect example—the steps stay the same, and you can use whatever is in the fridge. The pros at Food52 walk you through the quick and easy process.

There are a few technical issues that are really the key to stir-fry success. You need to get your pan hot enough (which is generally impossible to do with a wok because of the BTUs of American stoves and the thinness of the wok metal), but a non-stick skillet will do what you need it to do perfectly.

The other misstep is when you try to cram too many ingredients into the wrong-sized pan —this is my most common stir-fry failure. Easily solvable, with a little thing called patience.

Do you ever get tired of deciding what to cook? There are days when you get indoors and are tired and feeling lazy, and you are indifferent about food. Nothing in your recipe repertoire feels quite like worth making the effort for. This is especially hard when you need to cook for other people in your family who will be feeling like eating, and wondering what is for supper.

If the decision of ‘what to have’ always rests with you, it can feel like quite a responsibility and sometimes you can just run out of ideas, or feel very uninspired by anything.

In those situations, its good to have some quick and easy ‘stand-bys’ that you will probably have the ingredients for and are going to enjoy. These meals are quite filling and comforting as well as being really easy to cook – probably just what you need on a day when cooking a meal just seems like too much trouble.

Seven days of ridiculously delicious dinners, too easy to mess up and ready in 30 minutes or less. This stress-free meal plan, with helpful make-ahead notes and meal-prep tips, will help you get dinner on the table in no time.

Meal Prep Tips: If your grocery store has a buffet, you can often find pre-cooked quinoa to use in this recipe if you don't already have cooked quinoa on hand. Or make a big batch of quinoa on a Sunday to have for the week. The Basic Quinoa recipe is a foolproof way to make perfectly-cooked quinoa every time. If you have time earlier in the week, make the roasted pepper sauce ahead of time and store in the fridge.

Meal Prep Tips: If you have the time on a earlier night this week, make the salad dressing ahead of time—it will keep in the fridge for up to 3 days. Try the easy-to-follow steps for poached chicken in the "Tips" section on the recipe page, or simply pick up a pre-cooked chicken breast from the grocery store.

Once you realize you don't need a recipe for everything, you may find yourself cooking a lot more often. Stir-fry is a perfect example—the steps stay the same, and you can use whatever is in the fridge. The pros at Food52 walk you through the quick and easy process.

There are a few technical issues that are really the key to stir-fry success. You need to get your pan hot enough (which is generally impossible to do with a wok because of the BTUs of American stoves and the thinness of the wok metal), but a non-stick skillet will do what you need it to do perfectly.

The other misstep is when you try to cram too many ingredients into the wrong-sized pan —this is my most common stir-fry failure. Easily solvable, with a little thing called patience.

Do you ever get tired of deciding what to cook? There are days when you get indoors and are tired and feeling lazy, and you are indifferent about food. Nothing in your recipe repertoire feels quite like worth making the effort for. This is especially hard when you need to cook for other people in your family who will be feeling like eating, and wondering what is for supper.

If the decision of ‘what to have’ always rests with you, it can feel like quite a responsibility and sometimes you can just run out of ideas, or feel very uninspired by anything.

In those situations, its good to have some quick and easy ‘stand-bys’ that you will probably have the ingredients for and are going to enjoy. These meals are quite filling and comforting as well as being really easy to cook – probably just what you need on a day when cooking a meal just seems like too much trouble.

Seven days of ridiculously delicious dinners, too easy to mess up and ready in 30 minutes or less. This stress-free meal plan, with helpful make-ahead notes and meal-prep tips, will help you get dinner on the table in no time.

Meal Prep Tips: If your grocery store has a buffet, you can often find pre-cooked quinoa to use in this recipe if you don't already have cooked quinoa on hand. Or make a big batch of quinoa on a Sunday to have for the week. The Basic Quinoa recipe is a foolproof way to make perfectly-cooked quinoa every time. If you have time earlier in the week, make the roasted pepper sauce ahead of time and store in the fridge.

Meal Prep Tips: If you have the time on a earlier night this week, make the salad dressing ahead of time—it will keep in the fridge for up to 3 days. Try the easy-to-follow steps for poached chicken in the "Tips" section on the recipe page, or simply pick up a pre-cooked chicken breast from the grocery store.

One of the most common misconceptions about pork is that it needs to be cooked well-done. For quite a few decades, it was common practice to cook pork to a minimum internal temperature of 160 F. The slightest trace of pink in a grilled pork chop or roasted pork loin was cause for alarm.

Generations of people grew up wholly unaware that pork could be served in any way  other than overcooked. It's the only way they'd ever tasted it.

Why do so many people learn to cook the pink out of their pork? It all started with a parasitic worm called trichinella. Fairly prevalent in pork in the 1930s and '40s, trichinella caused a particularly unpleasant and sometimes fatal disease called trichinosis. To combat it, the government urged people to cook their pork to 160 F, which would kill the parasite.

You cook at home and each day you need to prepare meals for one of the world’s best chefs. Sometimes, he shows up with mates who are also culinary stars, like David Chang of Momofuku in New York. It’s a daunting prospect.

That’s the life of Nadine Levy Redzepi. Her husband, Rene, runs Noma in Copenhagen, which has won the title of World’s Best Restaurant four times. She says it doesn’t faze her at all.

“I don’t get nervous,” she says. “A lot of these chefs are very good friends of ours and have been for a long time. No chef would expect anyone whose house they go to would do crazy things, like with foams or whatever. When you work with that type of food every day, you almost look forward to getting home-cooked food.”

Once you realize you don't need a recipe for everything, you may find yourself cooking a lot more often. Stir-fry is a perfect example—the steps stay the same, and you can use whatever is in the fridge. The pros at Food52 walk you through the quick and easy process.

There are a few technical issues that are really the key to stir-fry success. You need to get your pan hot enough (which is generally impossible to do with a wok because of the BTUs of American stoves and the thinness of the wok metal), but a non-stick skillet will do what you need it to do perfectly.

The other misstep is when you try to cram too many ingredients into the wrong-sized pan —this is my most common stir-fry failure. Easily solvable, with a little thing called patience.

Do you ever get tired of deciding what to cook? There are days when you get indoors and are tired and feeling lazy, and you are indifferent about food. Nothing in your recipe repertoire feels quite like worth making the effort for. This is especially hard when you need to cook for other people in your family who will be feeling like eating, and wondering what is for supper.

If the decision of ‘what to have’ always rests with you, it can feel like quite a responsibility and sometimes you can just run out of ideas, or feel very uninspired by anything.

In those situations, its good to have some quick and easy ‘stand-bys’ that you will probably have the ingredients for and are going to enjoy. These meals are quite filling and comforting as well as being really easy to cook – probably just what you need on a day when cooking a meal just seems like too much trouble.

Seven days of ridiculously delicious dinners, too easy to mess up and ready in 30 minutes or less. This stress-free meal plan, with helpful make-ahead notes and meal-prep tips, will help you get dinner on the table in no time.

Meal Prep Tips: If your grocery store has a buffet, you can often find pre-cooked quinoa to use in this recipe if you don't already have cooked quinoa on hand. Or make a big batch of quinoa on a Sunday to have for the week. The Basic Quinoa recipe is a foolproof way to make perfectly-cooked quinoa every time. If you have time earlier in the week, make the roasted pepper sauce ahead of time and store in the fridge.

Meal Prep Tips: If you have the time on a earlier night this week, make the salad dressing ahead of time—it will keep in the fridge for up to 3 days. Try the easy-to-follow steps for poached chicken in the "Tips" section on the recipe page, or simply pick up a pre-cooked chicken breast from the grocery store.

One of the most common misconceptions about pork is that it needs to be cooked well-done. For quite a few decades, it was common practice to cook pork to a minimum internal temperature of 160 F. The slightest trace of pink in a grilled pork chop or roasted pork loin was cause for alarm.

Generations of people grew up wholly unaware that pork could be served in any way  other than overcooked. It's the only way they'd ever tasted it.

Why do so many people learn to cook the pink out of their pork? It all started with a parasitic worm called trichinella. Fairly prevalent in pork in the 1930s and '40s, trichinella caused a particularly unpleasant and sometimes fatal disease called trichinosis. To combat it, the government urged people to cook their pork to 160 F, which would kill the parasite.



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