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I don’t take shopping at Walmart lightly. A 200,000-square-foot labyrinth like the supercenter in my hometown of Plymouth is no place for a casual browser. One wrong turn and you can end up face to face with 7mm bullets instead of 60-inch TVs. That’s why I go armed with a plan that would do a Navy SEAL proud. I know what I’m after, where it’s located, and how to pull off a quick exit.

Lately, I’ve been making a beeline for the cereal aisle to fill my cart with Kashi Golean Crunch. It’s sweet and nutritious — essentially a perfect food. On my last Walmart visit, Crunch was selling for $2.84, $1.45 less than at the nearby Stop & Shop. That’s $75.40 in yearly savings if I eat a boxful a week. It’s money I can put in the bank, apply to bills, spend at a downtown Plymouth shop owned by mom and pop, or hand over to another massive corporation I frequent, like Target.

Walmart opponents would say I should feel guilty about getting this deal. The city of Portland, Oregon, recently said it was taking a moral stand by divesting all of its roughly $36 million in Walmart investments. Critics of the company reason that as a customer I’m abetting an outfit that denies “living wages,” crushes unionizing efforts, bullies vendors, hollows out the cores of small communities, and — who knows? — could be secretly building a giant spacecraft to whisk away top executives when Earth explodes.

I don’t take shopping at Walmart lightly. A 200,000-square-foot labyrinth like the supercenter in my hometown of Plymouth is no place for a casual browser. One wrong turn and you can end up face to face with 7mm bullets instead of 60-inch TVs. That’s why I go armed with a plan that would do a Navy SEAL proud. I know what I’m after, where it’s located, and how to pull off a quick exit.

Lately, I’ve been making a beeline for the cereal aisle to fill my cart with Kashi Golean Crunch. It’s sweet and nutritious — essentially a perfect food. On my last Walmart visit, Crunch was selling for $2.84, $1.45 less than at the nearby Stop & Shop. That’s $75.40 in yearly savings if I eat a boxful a week. It’s money I can put in the bank, apply to bills, spend at a downtown Plymouth shop owned by mom and pop, or hand over to another massive corporation I frequent, like Target.

Walmart opponents would say I should feel guilty about getting this deal. The city of Portland, Oregon, recently said it was taking a moral stand by divesting all of its roughly $36 million in Walmart investments. Critics of the company reason that as a customer I’m abetting an outfit that denies “living wages,” crushes unionizing efforts, bullies vendors, hollows out the cores of small communities, and — who knows? — could be secretly building a giant spacecraft to whisk away top executives when Earth explodes.

Who doesn't love Walmart ? The mega retail chain literally has everything you need — food, clothing, electronics, household items, and jewelry, among other necessities. And with such a grand mission, Walmart has become the type of store that attracts various stripes of people. Here's something to think about: The store may be America's last true retail melting pot. So, to honor the folks who frequent the family chain — they're a colorful cast of characters, to be sure — we've collected the 30 funniest photos from PeopleOfWalmart.com.

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People of Walmart (PoW) Is an entertainment website featuring user-submitted photos of Walmart customers considered to be socially awkward or undesirable by users of the site. PoW has been promoted largely on sites like Digg and Funny or Die , and linked on Facebook and Twitter . [2] [3] [4] [5] People of Walmart was founded in 2009 by brothers Andrew and Adam Kipple, and their friend Luke Wherry, who grew up together in Harrison City , Pennsylvania and attended Penn-Trafford High School. [6]

The website was founded in August 2009 after three men in their 20s—Andrew Kipple, his brother Adam, and their friend Luke Wherry—noticed at a South Carolina Wal-Mart a woman who looked like a stripper to them in a T-shirt that read "go f*** yourself" with a 2 year old in a harness and a man with a beard reminiscent of those worn by ZZ Top . [2] [6] They created the website to share what they find truly remarkable, ignoring more stereotypical redneck or mullets. While they created the site for their own social circle, it immediately went viral, enabling Wherry and Adam Kipple to leave their prior jobs. Andrew Kipple is a student. [6] Walmart has not commented. [2]

In addition to avoiding the ordinary, the trio refuse to post photos of people who are disabled or working Walmart employees. [2]

I don’t take shopping at Walmart lightly. A 200,000-square-foot labyrinth like the supercenter in my hometown of Plymouth is no place for a casual browser. One wrong turn and you can end up face to face with 7mm bullets instead of 60-inch TVs. That’s why I go armed with a plan that would do a Navy SEAL proud. I know what I’m after, where it’s located, and how to pull off a quick exit.

Lately, I’ve been making a beeline for the cereal aisle to fill my cart with Kashi Golean Crunch. It’s sweet and nutritious — essentially a perfect food. On my last Walmart visit, Crunch was selling for $2.84, $1.45 less than at the nearby Stop & Shop. That’s $75.40 in yearly savings if I eat a boxful a week. It’s money I can put in the bank, apply to bills, spend at a downtown Plymouth shop owned by mom and pop, or hand over to another massive corporation I frequent, like Target.

Walmart opponents would say I should feel guilty about getting this deal. The city of Portland, Oregon, recently said it was taking a moral stand by divesting all of its roughly $36 million in Walmart investments. Critics of the company reason that as a customer I’m abetting an outfit that denies “living wages,” crushes unionizing efforts, bullies vendors, hollows out the cores of small communities, and — who knows? — could be secretly building a giant spacecraft to whisk away top executives when Earth explodes.

Who doesn't love Walmart ? The mega retail chain literally has everything you need — food, clothing, electronics, household items, and jewelry, among other necessities. And with such a grand mission, Walmart has become the type of store that attracts various stripes of people. Here's something to think about: The store may be America's last true retail melting pot. So, to honor the folks who frequent the family chain — they're a colorful cast of characters, to be sure — we've collected the 30 funniest photos from PeopleOfWalmart.com.

I don’t take shopping at Walmart lightly. A 200,000-square-foot labyrinth like the supercenter in my hometown of Plymouth is no place for a casual browser. One wrong turn and you can end up face to face with 7mm bullets instead of 60-inch TVs. That’s why I go armed with a plan that would do a Navy SEAL proud. I know what I’m after, where it’s located, and how to pull off a quick exit.

Lately, I’ve been making a beeline for the cereal aisle to fill my cart with Kashi Golean Crunch. It’s sweet and nutritious — essentially a perfect food. On my last Walmart visit, Crunch was selling for $2.84, $1.45 less than at the nearby Stop & Shop. That’s $75.40 in yearly savings if I eat a boxful a week. It’s money I can put in the bank, apply to bills, spend at a downtown Plymouth shop owned by mom and pop, or hand over to another massive corporation I frequent, like Target.

Walmart opponents would say I should feel guilty about getting this deal. The city of Portland, Oregon, recently said it was taking a moral stand by divesting all of its roughly $36 million in Walmart investments. Critics of the company reason that as a customer I’m abetting an outfit that denies “living wages,” crushes unionizing efforts, bullies vendors, hollows out the cores of small communities, and — who knows? — could be secretly building a giant spacecraft to whisk away top executives when Earth explodes.

Who doesn't love Walmart ? The mega retail chain literally has everything you need — food, clothing, electronics, household items, and jewelry, among other necessities. And with such a grand mission, Walmart has become the type of store that attracts various stripes of people. Here's something to think about: The store may be America's last true retail melting pot. So, to honor the folks who frequent the family chain — they're a colorful cast of characters, to be sure — we've collected the 30 funniest photos from PeopleOfWalmart.com.

This page is generated by Plesk , the leading hosting automation software. You see this page because there is no Web site at this address.

Plesk is a hosting control panel with simple and secure web server and website management tools. It was specially designed to help IT specialists manage web, DNS, mail and other services through a comprehensive and user-friendly GUI. Learn more about Plesk .



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