This is Big Book

  • The M1 Garand: Post World War II: Scott A. Duff.
  • The M1 Garand : Post World War II by Scott A. Duff (1989.



The M1 carbine (formally the United States Carbine, Caliber .30, M1 ) is a lightweight, easy to use, [3] .30 caliber (7.62 mm ) semi-automatic carbine that was a standard firearm for the U.S. military during World War II , the Korean War and well into the Vietnam War . The M1 carbine was produced in several variants and was widely used by not only the U.S. military, but by military, paramilitary and police forces around the world. It has also been a popular civilian firearm.

The M2 carbine is the selective-fire version of the M1 carbine capable of firing in both semi-automatic and full-automatic . The M3 carbine was an M2 carbine with an active infrared scope system. [4]

Despite its name and similar appearance, the M1 carbine is not a shorter version of the M1 Garand rifle . It is a completely different firearm, and it fires a different type of ammunition. It was simply called a carbine because it is smaller and lighter than the Garand.

The M1 carbine (formally the United States Carbine, Caliber .30, M1 ) is a lightweight, easy to use, [3] .30 caliber (7.62 mm ) semi-automatic carbine that was a standard firearm for the U.S. military during World War II , the Korean War and well into the Vietnam War . The M1 carbine was produced in several variants and was widely used by not only the U.S. military, but by military, paramilitary and police forces around the world. It has also been a popular civilian firearm.

The M2 carbine is the selective-fire version of the M1 carbine capable of firing in both semi-automatic and full-automatic . The M3 carbine was an M2 carbine with an active infrared scope system. [4]

Despite its name and similar appearance, the M1 carbine is not a shorter version of the M1 Garand rifle . It is a completely different firearm, and it fires a different type of ammunition. It was simply called a carbine because it is smaller and lighter than the Garand.

I’ve spent months kicking this “Best” around. Considering all types of space lasers and sniper weapons and over-powered pistols. But no matter how many other weapons I consider, I always keep coming back to an antique Second World War battle rifle.

Unlike a lot of the other obvious favourites for a title like this, the M1—which has featured in over a dozen blockbuster video games—was a real historical weapon, not the product of some video game studio’s imagination. So in theory it should be boring, with a set of limitations that make it nowhere near as cool as something like a pulse rifle or rail gun.

Developed in the 1920s, and entering service with the US Army in 1936, the M1 was the backbone of American infantry forces in the Second World War. Unlike other rifles of the time, which were bolt-action and required manual reloading after each shot, the semi-automatic M1 could fire eight rounds uninterrupted, after which you’d hear the rifle’s trademark “ping” as the empty clip was automatically ejected.

The M1 carbine (formally the United States Carbine, Caliber .30, M1 ) is a lightweight, easy to use, [3] .30 caliber (7.62 mm ) semi-automatic carbine that was a standard firearm for the U.S. military during World War II , the Korean War and well into the Vietnam War . The M1 carbine was produced in several variants and was widely used by not only the U.S. military, but by military, paramilitary and police forces around the world. It has also been a popular civilian firearm.

The M2 carbine is the selective-fire version of the M1 carbine capable of firing in both semi-automatic and full-automatic . The M3 carbine was an M2 carbine with an active infrared scope system. [4]

Despite its name and similar appearance, the M1 carbine is not a shorter version of the M1 Garand rifle . It is a completely different firearm, and it fires a different type of ammunition. It was simply called a carbine because it is smaller and lighter than the Garand.

I’ve spent months kicking this “Best” around. Considering all types of space lasers and sniper weapons and over-powered pistols. But no matter how many other weapons I consider, I always keep coming back to an antique Second World War battle rifle.

Unlike a lot of the other obvious favourites for a title like this, the M1—which has featured in over a dozen blockbuster video games—was a real historical weapon, not the product of some video game studio’s imagination. So in theory it should be boring, with a set of limitations that make it nowhere near as cool as something like a pulse rifle or rail gun.

Developed in the 1920s, and entering service with the US Army in 1936, the M1 was the backbone of American infantry forces in the Second World War. Unlike other rifles of the time, which were bolt-action and required manual reloading after each shot, the semi-automatic M1 could fire eight rounds uninterrupted, after which you’d hear the rifle’s trademark “ping” as the empty clip was automatically ejected.

It’s debatable whether U.S. military arms have ever been as sought after by collectors as they are right now. Long gone are the golden days where back pages of magazines were filled with ads of low-cost military weapons. Faint are the memories of local gun stores with barrels of rifles available for a price that would put a smile on even the thriftiest skinflint. It was a time when these guns were so abundant they nearly begged to be modified to cast their memories of military service far behind them in exchange for a long life of target shooting or hunting.

Questions like those outlined above are the reason that Rock Island Auction Company took some time to assemble data based on its more than 25,000 annual firearm sales. Sale prices of M1 Garands were noted over several years and compiled to help collectors make some sense out of the current market and what they should expect when they see M1 Garand rifles for sale. Before we get to the numbers, here is how the data was prepared.

Chosen at random, most of the rifles used for their data were Springfield made with some H&R (Harrington & Richardson), Winchester, and IH (International Harvester) that also found themselves in the final groupings. Their quantities are in the order listed. Involving a healthy mix of World War 2 era rifles and post-war examples, each data set also had several examples that included their CMP paperwork.



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